Reviews

Metamorphoses, by Denis Feeney, David Raeburn, Ovid

bookaholic01's review

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adventurous dark funny informative lighthearted medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? N/A
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

dwellordream's review

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mysterious medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? N/A
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0


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caline_g's review

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adventurous challenging fast-paced

4.0

sageyoung's review

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4.25

love it. didn't read all of it but the excerpts i did read for class were 10/10

rachellik2's review

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4.0

Virgil could never

bookishwendy's review

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4.0

description

Diana looks so sweet. Just don't let her catch you looking, or she'll give you antlers and set your own dogs on you.

Between the ages of 8 and 10 I was obsessed with all things Roman & Greek. I had these water-color illustrated books of classic myths and knew them all by heart, even if DID pronounce Eurydice like Yuri-dies. (and still do, apparently). I did eventually move on to other obsessions but it was a joy to revisit some of my favorite stories, even if (or because?) Ovid's versions have not been sanitized of the violence, sex and all sorts of "alternate lifestyles" that I'm pretty sure I would have remembered had they been illustrated in watercolor in my childhood books.

description
Seriously, Ovid's version is way more intense than...well, this.

For the most part, these stories were just as riveting all over again, although there are so many names flying at you at once, and stories within stories within stories, that it can get confusing at times. I'd like to go back again someday with a paper copy of this book, and take my time with it. And yet, I think the average modern reader could would get something out of this. It's not so unfamiliar now, is it? I know Game of Thrones is popular these days because it pushes the envelope with all the incest and the killing off of favorite characters and deadly weddings and dragon queens...well all that was written down by Ovid (and other storytellers before him)--these elements are as old as civilization itself.

description
Red wedding? Yeah, Ovid did that a few millennia ago.

There may be no original stories, but if the old ones don't get old, who cares?

amandar9fa2f's review

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3.0

The Roman myths of transformation in hexameter verse.

Taken as a collection of short stories, this has the same strengths and weaknesses of all collections. Some good, some not so. But, oh, when it is good, as in Phaethon pleading with his father, Phoebus/Apollo, to drive the Sun God’s chariot across the sky, it is divine.

This translation by David Raeburn is contemporary and accessible. Lovely to dip into or read in its entirety.

readingisadoingword's review

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5.0

I started this book as part of a course on Greek and Roman mythology and just recently got around to finishing it. All the classic tales and characters are figured. A great mixture of amusing and emotional.

darwin8u's review

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5.0

“Happy is the man who has broken the chains which hurt the mind, and has given up worrying once and for all.”
― Ovid, Metamorphoses

description

Ovid -- the David Bowie of Latin literature. I chewed on this book of myth-poems the entire time I was tramping around Rome. I was looking for the right words to describe my feelings about it. It isn't that I didn't like it. It is an unequivocal masterpiece. I'm amazed by it. I see Ovid's genes in everything (paintings, sculptures, poems and prose). He is both modern and classic, reverent and wicked, lovely and obscene all at once. It is just hard to wrestle him down. To pin my thoughts about 'the Metamorphoses' into words. Structure really fails me.

That I guess is the sign for me of a book's depth or success with me. It makes me wish I could read it in the original form. I'm not satisfied with Dante in English. I want him in Italian. I'm not satisfied with Ovid in English. I want to experience his poetry, his playfulness, his wit in Latin.

I still prefer the poetry of Homer and Dante, but Ovid isn't embarrassed by the company of the greats; so not Zeus or Neptune, but maybe Apollo.