Reviews

Windwitch, by Susan Dennard

anna_spurlock's review

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adventurous medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

4.0

shrimpasta's review

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adventurous challenging dark funny mysterious medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0

just as good as the first read! found myself laughing at the travels of safi and vaness's gang and smiling at iseult's ;)

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thejufox's review against another edition

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4.0

3.75-4 stars!

Just like Truthwitch, Windwitch jumps straight into the action! Things get blown up and the story picks up immediately. At the end of Truthwitch, the 4 main characters (Safi, Iseult, Merik and Aeduan) are separated, each in a different part of the world. Fairly quickly I realised that it was taking me a lot of effort to keep putting myself to reading. A lot more than I needed for Truthwitch. And by the midway point I realised that this was because the one aspect that I loved most in Truthwitch just wasn't there as much in Windwitch... the interactions between (any combination of) the main characters.

Safi and Iseult's friendship is without a doubt one of the best parts of this series. In Truthwitch we see them have funny, casual conversations and we see them working and fighting together to get through all of the mess that's going on. Since they aren't together when Windwitch begins, that fun aspect just isn't there. Windwitch felt a lot darker and more serious than Truthwitch because there was no lightness to compensate it.
Once I got around halfway through, there are main character interactions, so I started enjoying those chapters more and my reading picked up a lot!

I loved the insane amount of mysteries this book had going on. So many questions are constantly running through your head and even though answers are being thrown around, you still feel like there's more questions left unanswered than ones that have been solved. There was a constant feeling of uncertainty about who we can trust and who is going to end up betraying someone or who they're working for.

So overall, even though I wasn't as into some of the storylines as I was in Truthwitch and I missed the funny casual dialogue between Safi and Iseult (and Safi and Merik), Windwitch is a great continuation and all of the mysteries and questions I still have after reading it make me super excited about the rest of this series.

sazzz's review against another edition

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adventurous tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? N/A
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.25

butteredtoast's review against another edition

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4.0

This book was amazing. Its for sure a fav.

ayah_reads's review against another edition

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3.0

Somewhere between 3 to 4 stars???? More so 3 stars?????

Like the rating, reviewing this book is difficult. I don't really know how I feel about it.

This book has many perspectives, and usually I love multi povs, but it felt like too much. We had FIVE povs, and while two of them converge earlier on, we still maintain basically four separate plotlines. Obviously they intertwine, but it was still frustrating.

Aside from two characters and their povs, the other three povs don't interact with each other for the majority of this book, because of this it really felt like separate plotlines which could have been fine, but we never got to delve into each enough because we constantly had to go to another pov. Even though the book takes place over a short amount of time, it felt really slow???? Yes things are happening, but it just didn't feel like enough. Only in the last quarter of the book did things pick up, and that's extremely late in the game.

I guess if I was attached to more of the characters maybe this would have been better??? But because most of them were seperated, we barely got any character dynamics and relationships, and for this series, I feel like I need them to actually care about the characters??? It's probably partly why the two povs that converged where my favourite parts of this book.

~some spoilers~

Like the first book, Iseult and Aeduan are my favourite characters, povs, and plotlines. A big motivation of me to read was to get to their povs

fadenblau_reads's review

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adventurous challenging emotional reflective tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.0

vszupiany's review against another edition

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4.0

And now the wait for book #3.

wonderl_nd's review against another edition

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5.0


Beautiful—so utterly beautiful. The writing, the flow. There were times I wanted to cry, and times where I wanted to scream. There were times we here I wanted to laugh and smile.

This book truly truly is amazing. Every single aspect of it is just so perfect that even after its completion, I want to keep reading.

I hate hate hate different POVs—but this book, oh my, has taught me to love them

chrissiewhitley's review against another edition

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2.0

I think this series and I are going on a break, perhaps permanently. After finishing it, I was left with many of the same feelings I had after finishing the first book, [b:Truthwitch|21414439|Truthwitch (The Witchlands, #1)|Susan Dennard|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1428675822s/21414439.jpg|40715259].

Firstly and personally, I wish the story had been told from fewer points-of-view. I think the book suffers from an unnecessary slowness as a result of every change in narrator occurring too often and from too many characters' points-of-view. Frankly, I was utterly bored when the story was in either Safia's or Merik's hands. For the majority of this book, these two characters had almost nothing going on outside of their own heads (other than walking) ... and speaking of internal dialogue—this constant drone of the repeated mantras and nursery rhymes and songs was just too irritating, too distracting, and too gimmicky. I felt the desire to simply fill gaps and blank space in the story lift off the page and sing itself to me every single time.

With every character switch, I felt the old catchphrase, "Meanwhile, back at the ranch...," dance in front of my eyes. The entire structure was too episodic and choppy, with an attempt at a never-ending ascension towards the crescendo of the plot. Every chapter felt like it was taking a stab at another cliffhanger in the continuing saga of cliffhangers.

Secondly, I still felt as though there were too many unanswered questions about the world Dennard created. Many of them the same questions I had after the first book. This was basically a traveling story, everyone's on the move, and that left little time for world-building and history-telling. After [b:Truthwitch|21414439|Truthwitch (The Witchlands, #1)|Susan Dennard|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1428675822s/21414439.jpg|40715259], I was frankly worried that this book would be nothing but a history info-dump; I couldn't have been more wrong.

I needed more backstory, not for the characters, but for the world. What are the different types of witches? Why all the division and what is the basic history for the kingdom itself? Mostly, I found the fatal flaw in not being able to understand the varied systems of belief.

With Iseult and Aeduan being polar opposites in that respect, one very pious and the other very near atheistic, the religions needed history and doctrines to help me land these characters on solid ground about who they are and in what direction they could be headed. This is especially important seeing that the entire premise of the book, that the embodiment of the Cahr Awen has returned, possibly in Iseult and Safiya.

Lastly, and ridiculously enough, a main annoyance was that I actually found myself liking the story and interested in the overall outcome. Dammit, that world Dennard created has so much potential, but I am just not sure it can be pulled off. Maybe I can just get enough from reading reviews and summaries to suffice, because I am not really loving the way in which this story is being told. Perhaps it is just a difference in styles, but I have no plans to read the next book.