Reviews

The Order, by Daniel Silva

stormhawk's review against another edition

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3.0

Interesting story but nothing special here. Could have used a little more action, which is odd sense most of these types of books get silly with the non-stop action.

leonix's review against another edition

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3.0

Even though I enjoyed the book overall, there is no question that there is a different pace and dynamics here. It's definitely a more quiet mystery rather than the quick paced spy thriller centered around the legendary feats of its protagonist.

Maybe because I joined the Allon party late (only five books ago) I am not ready to let go. I hope Gabriel doesn't retire anytime soon and there is more fire inside the old spy.

sahibooknerd's review

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dark informative mysterious reflective tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

4.0

c_a_r_l's review

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adventurous mysterious tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

meganjohnson2's review against another edition

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2.0

I love this series and the characters, and I look forward to the new books each year. This one felt different, and I just didn't enjoy it as much. I enjoyed some of the Catholic history, but it slowed the story down. It was definitely not what I expected from the series.

bafee1205's review against another edition

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3.0

This book wasn’t bad, but it definitely was a departure from other books in the series. I miss the team members - they got named in this book, but that was about it. I will continue to read, as Daniel Silva is my favorite author, but I hope he returns to what made the series great.

brandylyons's review against another edition

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5.0

Love love love these books. Gabriel is one of my all time favorite literary characters and the author continues to amaze me. (Also, Chiara is amazing, even if she had a smaller part to play in this story). There were moments where I was so stressed about what was happening that I had to walk away from the book! But I always came right back. Always. Can’t wait for the next one!

outandabout's review

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adventurous informative mysterious medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

Listened to this one. Interesting story interspersed with historical reference sections, definitely fictional but with a sense of historical reality. Explored the relationships between the killing of Jesus and the Holocaust, through the eyes of an art restorer who is investigating the death of a Pope. 

romi126's review

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fast-paced
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

3.0

coolhand773's review

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adventurous tense fast-paced
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

2.0

For the first time in the 20-book series, my reaction to the latest Daniel Silva offering was: meh. I'm not exactly sure whether it was the subject matter or whether Silva's formulaic approach to each installment is finally starting to wear thin, but this book was a chore to finish. 

The backdrop for the latest installment is the Catholic Church. And granted, the history of the Catholic church is riddled with failures ranging from sexual scandal to dereliction of duty during the Holocaust, but Silva fills page after page with liberal (and controversial) biblical textual theory, doing his best to undermine the credibility of the Gospel accounts. That, coupled with a barely interesting plot with transparent twists, and I'm half-tempted to suggest a new title for the 2nd edition: The Boreder.

I've loved the series up until now. Not all of the books have been my favorites, but I've enjoyed nearly every one. The combination of biblical criticism (which felt shoe-horned into the plot), a shop-worn use of the "far Right" as the nefarious and far-reaching network of bogeymen, along with a paper-thin plot, made this a less-than-enjoyable read. Maybe it's time to let Gabriel retire?

Thanks for taking the time to read my review!