darrylb's review against another edition

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4.0

This is a good, and classic book on worldview by Schaeffer, and is a helpful introduction to the work of those who follow in his footsteps (e.g. Nancy Pearcey). There are two things I felt let this book down. First, it lacks references, which means you're largely taking Schaeffer's words at face value (fortunately, I believe he is right on the money). Secondly, the final two chapters strike me as crystal ball gazing. I think Schaeffer would have benefitted from Neil Postman's Amusing Ourselves to Death if he had survived to read it, and I would commend Postman's approach over Schaeffer's for those interested in how the trajectory of the 1980's might be projected into the future.
Other than these, this is worth reading for anyone considering a reading course on worldview.

shoelessmama's review against another edition

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4.0

I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around everything I read in this book. Although it was written 40 years ago I felt that the material remains pertinent and was at times prophetic. It was easy to think about the advances in science and the events that have transpired, etc. since the writing of this book taking them into account and applying them to the author's theories. I won't say that I agreed with everything that the author had to say but I found all of it thought-provoking. Despite the author's possible (probable) unfairness to some historical figures (notably Thomas Aquinas and Francis Bacon) the author's overall message remains undamaged for me. History is interpreted differently by different people (and when it comes to television it get's sensationalized to keep you tuned in through the commercial break). Upon finishing this book I wish I had someone to pick it apart with in person... especially the bits that went a little over my head.

joshmillernj's review against another edition

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4.0

This book, written forty years ago (1976), is considered a classic work by Schaeffer. Not an easy read by any stretch, but one that will give the reader a solid foundation in world views and where they will lead.

The title is taken from a phrase found in the Bible in Ezekiel 33:10. I found some very interesting truths in the book that are playing out just as the author stated forty years ago.

lmshearer's review against another edition

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challenging informative slow-paced

2.0

This book, originally written in the 1970s, reminds me of all the anti-secularist attitudes I grew up around, and so realizing their source was enlightening, but wow, has this book not aged well. Its weak arguments and poor structure work against any value the reader could take from this book.

grllopez's review against another edition

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5.0

This is one of my favorite books on culture. I need to reread it soon and give an actual review of it, b/c it has been a long time since I first read it.

UPDATE: Finally reread this. Still relevant and more than ever. Schaeffer wrote this decades ago and he could not have been more prophetic. He was already talking about the "Elites" and the "Technocrats!"

Schaeffer says there are only two alternatives in the natural flow of events. First is imposed order and second is an affirmation of the base which gave freedom without chaos in the first place -- God's revelation in the Bible and His revelation through Christ.

The first, imposed order, is based on Humanism and has always and still does lead to misery! Man is NOT a machine. Personal peace and affluence do not bring happiness or answers to man's questions, and neither does authoritarian governments, like Communism. Only knowledge of the infinite-personal God/Creator of the universe and a relationship with Christ as Savior and Lord, which provides God's revelation for morals, values, and meaning for living. "This is truth that gives a unity to all knowledge and life."

And Schaeffer says that "Christians do not need to be a majority in order for this influence on society to occur." It is that second alternative that "we should take seriously."

truenorth's review against another edition

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challenging hopeful informative reflective medium-paced

4.0

darylreads's review against another edition

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challenging hopeful informative slow-paced

5.0

What a prescient book... this is a very important book. 

memlhd's review against another edition

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4.0

December 4, 2015

powellen's review against another edition

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5.0

Fascinating and perceptive analysis of how Western thought has shifted over time. It's devastating, though perhaps not unexpected, to see the results of man-centered thinking to this day.

How should we then live?

“We are not only to know the right world view… but consciously to act upon that world view so as to influence society… across the whole spectrum of life, as much as we can to the extent of our individual and collective ability."

Simply put, we must live in accordance with the Truth.

djlinick's review against another edition

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5.0

This book does a fantastic job tracing the parallels between societal abandonment of Christian values in the West and the gradual death of objective morals, truths, and human value overall.