_michelle_'s review

Go to review page

3.0

A pleasent enough read, but really a mixed bag overall. The further in the book I went, the stories seemed to get longer and less entertaining, though there were an exceptional few. Notable stories include The Tapistried Chamber; The Phantom Coach; The Judge's House; The Red Room; The Monkey's Paw; and The Clock (my personal fave) and a few other, lesser ones.. Sadly, many of the other stories are skipable. I would recomend borrowing this book or buying it second-hand. If you can find most of the listed stories in another compilation, go for it. Now, don't get me wrong, I'm crazy about the stories I thought were good, but the collection as a whole was not so great overall.

3* = "I liked it"; It could have been a better collection than it was, but the good stories redeemed it.

phenexrose's review

Go to review page

mysterious slow-paced

4.0

shane's review

Go to review page

5.0

In a class of it's own. Every single story is to be cherished. Ever single story is just begging to be read and re-read. If you see this book for sale, snap out up quick. A beautiful book.

alexctelander's review

Go to review page

3.0

In an easy-to-use paperback edition, The Oxford Book of English Ghost Stories serves as a welcoming traveling companion when going just about anywhere, especially through the dingy streets and foggy countryside of England. This is a collection that features stories that scared a lot of people when published, and continue to do so even now. Renowned authors make an appearance here: Bram Stoker (naturally), Henry James, H. G. Wells, Sir Walter Scott and Edith Wharton to name a few. Infamous stories show their original creation here with tales like “The Monkey’s Paw” and “The Hollow Man.” A collection that anyone who enjoys having shivers sent up their spines must have.

Originally published on December 9th, 2002.

For over 500 book reviews, and over 40 exclusive author interviews (both audio and written), visit BookBanter.
More...