Reviews for The Name of the Wind, by Patrick Rothfuss

meverard's review against another edition

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4.0

I can probably say more about the stuff I disliked than the stuff I did like about the book (whether this has something to do with the novel or my semi-pessimistic nature, I don't know). Kvothe is an arrogant young man who is inapt when it comes to women, but is a complete prodigy when it comes to everything else. This is one of the numerous fantasy clichés/motifs that The Name of the Wind has in store for its readers. The University, however, was really interesting and one of the things I liked.
Putting all the negativity aside, I still want to read A Wise Man's Fear to find out if Kvothe becomes less of a prick and to learn more about Rothfuss's fantasy world.

anbat's review against another edition

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5.0

“Words are pale shadows of forgotten names. As names have power, words have power. Words can light fires in the minds of men. Words can wring tears from the hardest hearts.”

I've been postponing the reading of this books for two years, and now that I have already read it I just can ask myself: Why have you postponed it!?
It is the best book I've read in a while. It is clever, it is funny, and sad. And it treats words as if they were more than that.

gabrield's review

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adventurous dark mysterious tense slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

3.25

Enjoyable story. Good descriptive writing. Lackluster characters and development.

carmendarlene's review against another edition

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5.0

Could NOT put this down. Huge thanks to my friend Peter for giving it to me. I wouldn't have purchased it for myself.

carlalaureano's review against another edition

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5.0

Easily the most impressive recent fantasy debut I've read. Patrick Rothfuss is a master at creating engaging characters and setting and displays the most accomplished use of the framed narrative as a storytelling device that I have read by a contemporary author. A must read for anyone who even thinks they might like fantasy.

As an aside, Rothfuss is funny and personable "in real life" and takes the time to personally respond to fans who contact him through his website. It's worthwhile to note that he is the only author whom I've ever contacted for any reason, and he was kind enough to offer encouragement in my own writing endeavors.

3/27/11 - I'm currently rereading this before starting into the second book "Wise Man's Fear," and once again, I'm blown away. It is so unusual to find a genre book that can pass for literature in terms of style and voice. The shift between omniscient narrator (the frame) to first person narration (story within the frame) works to add tension and slow the pace of the story as needed. It also beautifully contrasts the two Kvothes we know-- the man he is versus the boy he was-- and causes the reader to wonder what could have created such a dramatic change, giving the impetus to continue reading. Well done, indeed.

erratic's review against another edition

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2.0

I was very curious to start reading this novel after all this praise. I was sure that i wouldnt like it from what i have read but i decided to give it a try since someone gave it as a gift to me. I prefer darker and grittier fantasy.
The first chapters were a nice surprise for me. I liked the atmosphere and the world building. The mythology of the world that was blended to reality and the roguish mood of Tarbean times. All these collapsed for me when Kvothe entered the university. It was like reading a less flavory Harry Potter thing. I dont know what will follow and it might be interesting but Kvothe lost me somewhere in the road and what started as a suprisingly nice story turned to something cliched and boring that i couldnt follow.

emma2forsythe's review

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adventurous challenging mysterious medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

fairydagger's review against another edition

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5.0

This is the best book I think I have ever read in my life. It is deliciously complex. Rothfuss is a literary god.

megan_whatmeganreads's review against another edition

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5.0

I wish I could read this all over again for the first time. It was THAT good. Ironically, I had never heard about this book, or the apparently famous not-yet-completed trilogy it's a part of, until I went to one of my fave indie bookshops (yay for Joseph Beth-Lexington!) in search of a totally different book. The ridiculously well-read (of course he was) gentleman that rang up my eventual purchases saw my daughter's Hamilton shirt and he started talking to her about the genius that is Lin-Manuel Miranda. He mentioned that Lin-Manuel was adapting his favorite book, The Name of The Wind, into a television series. He started describing it and I immediately went back and bought it too. :)

It was worth every penny. Epic journeys, schools of magic, characters I quickly became obsessed with, and a story to end all stories. This is a book you can (and I did) get lost in.

(*The second installment was just as fantastic. NOW COME ON, ROTHFUSS, AND GIVE US THE FINAL ONE, FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THAT'S HOLY AND GOOD!)