ashleyholstrom's review against another edition

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4.0

Abby Norman suffers through undiagnosed endometriosis for years. Her leg goes numb, she loses 30 pounds, and when she goes to a doctor, she’s sent home with antibiotics. She knows her pain is real, not “all in her head,” so she starts digging through medical journals to find her own diagnosis. But doctors never believe her, thinking she’s too young and naive to really understand her body the way a medical professional can. A truly eye-opening read about gender bias in the medical community.

From Get Your Bleed on: 5 Important Books about Periods and the Best Books We Read in February 2018 at Book Riot.

gdonahue's review against another edition

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3.0

Okay...

First - CW: there are a lot! Child abuse, ED, chronic illness, gaslighting, graphic depictions of medical procedures (including an autopsy). Just a heads up, because while I went in expecting plenty of medical stuff, I didn’t necessarily expect everything else.

Second: I think this book has been poorly marketed. The back cover lists genre as memoir/health, and this is accurate, but the title, subtitle, jacket description, and reviews that I have read all caused me to expect something that was at least 50/50 scientific research and memoir. The science in this book and the sections where the author discusses the history of medical misogyny and the failures (especially of the American medical system) to effectively diagnose and treat women, were by far my favorite sections of the book. The writing was mostly clear and made interesting historical and scientific arguments for this failure. Unfortunately, for this reader, those sections were maybe 20% of the book, while the other 80% was memoir. Perhaps if I had been primed for a memoir, I would have read this book differently, but I really went in expecting a personally informed but clarifying take on issues with the way the medical system diagnoses and treats women. Instead I found myself reading hundreds of pages about the author’s first relationship, childhood trauma, emancipation from her parents, relationships with mother figures, connections to the early internet, precocity that led strangers to remark that she probably went to medical school, etc. The author has clearly been through a lot, and I think it is incredibly important to have full, living and breathing depictions of people living with chronic illness, but this book didn’t feel particularly honest or groundbreaking, but more like a lengthy blog post that kind of rambled and didn’t make a cogent argument. I’m not sure I would recommend this book to others and it really left me wishing I had read something different in the end.

onekindofdivine's review against another edition

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4.0

This was a very validating read for my own personal struggles. However, I found the sections about the history of women’s health to be far more engaging than the memoir sections. The sequence of the book was also pretty random without a very clear through line to follow. The author gave words to things I have long felt and experienced, though, and for that, I cannot give this book less than 4 stars.

isibee's review against another edition

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medium-paced

3.75

stuffsamdoes_'s review against another edition

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2.0

2.5/5 stars. TW: Suicide, drugs, alcohol, eating disorders, trauma, abuse. I didn't love this book, in fact, I felt like it didn't actually talk about doctors not believing in a woman's pain until the last few chapters. Most of it was about her life and her mother, which I understand how it all tied in and expressing her pain, but I thought this book was going to be much different.

zhzhang's review against another edition

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3.0

It has a strong beginning. The most candid and raw description of pain that I have ever read.

mymorie's review against another edition

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emotional informative fast-paced

4.25

tomnana's review against another edition

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4.0

This book is clearly a bit more than it's title, and for a while I was put off by that. I would say, generously, that at least 50% is memoir unrelated to the author's interactions with medicine. It is just as much a Quest to understand her own health, body, and personal history. In the end, however, I can't deny that it's a powerfully emotive story and I am ultimately glad to have read it.

mccalab's review

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emotional informative medium-paced

4.0


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elle_thereader's review against another edition

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informative

3.0

take a shot every time she says sarah lawrence