Reviews

I'm Afraid of Men, by Vivek Shraya

femmechowder's review against another edition

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5.0

Required reading for cisgendered folks. What a concise and helpful book.

ihoness's review against another edition

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3.75

a short but important book, im glad i read it!! the last 5-10 pages were (imo) the most impactful for me so i wish it had been a bit longer to explore those themes

fatirna's review against another edition

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challenging informative fast-paced

5.0

If you’re feeling threatened by this book.... You are exactly the problem Vivek is talking about.

jessreichard's review against another edition

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informative reflective fast-paced

3.0

pagesofahrya's review against another edition

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4.0

quotes that really hit home and need to be out there:

“Most men don’t think they’re misogynists, let alone think they have misogynist attitudes or engage in misogynist behaviours. Just as those who exhibit racist tendencies wouldn’t classify themselves as racist, few men would admit to hating women or believe they hate women.”

“I think Indian philosophies and Aboriginal philosophies have something to offer us here: there is possibly a “way to live in harmony with the earth and the elements whereby we understand it and we don’t destroy it for the future generations; which is why my plays talk so much—to put it as simply as I can—of the return of the goddess, the displacement of god as a man, and the establishment of god as a woman. It’s about the return of women’s dominion to women; I think “man” deserves to be put in his place.”

krudereads's review against another edition

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5.0

What a powerful book for such a tiny read. This book gave an intersectional insight on how our society treats LGBTQ+ individuals; I recommend this for everyone to read. Vivek Shraya gives a raw and honest insight on her life as a bisexual person and also a trans woman. I feel like a gained a new valuable perspective on understanding gender and truly how harmful the effects of misogyny, homophobia, and transphobia are to our society as a whole. This was an eye-opening read and Shraya's life journey of coming into herself is an important voice that challenges society's current view of gender and sexuality.

leabhairagustae1's review against another edition

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Short, insightful and well written.

I would highly recommend the audiobook, which is narrated by the author.

therealdeandraa's review against another edition

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5.0

I love this. Insightful. Showing awareness to the majority of pressures and struggles trans/queer people go through. Made me tear up a bit.

jordknows's review against another edition

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5.0

A beautiful and deeply vulnerable memoir that will ask you to confront your biases, privilege, and thoughts on gender. Her words will challenge you to look at what happens when fear takes the lead.

“I’ve always been disturbed by this transition, by the reality that often the only way to capture someone’s attention and to encourage them to recognize their own internal biases and to work to alter them is to confront them with sensational stories of suffering. Why is my humanity only seen or cared about when I share the ways in which I have been victimized and violated?”

lesbianlis's review against another edition

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5.0

beautiful!! a must read for everyone!!! abolish gender!!!