Reviews

The Gifts of Imperfection, by Brené Brown

itsthemandashow's review against another edition

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challenging informative inspiring reflective fast-paced

5.0

mcferranc's review

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4.0

*4.5

nrwebster26's review

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4.0

This is a book I'll need to reread as I grow into self-acceptance. I felt defensive early on, but came through to 4 stars as I understood and believed in Brene more. Brene untangled guilt and shame from the knot of crummy feelings. I appreciated her descriptions of a few slip-ups and triumphs, so I knew what to watch out for when DIGging deep.

stormborn's review against another edition

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reflective slow-paced

3.0

tianarose's review against another edition

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informative inspiring reflective slow-paced

5.0

starrpixie's review

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informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

4.25

vanessa_issa's review against another edition

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4.0

Fui lendo aos pouquinhos, deixando pros dias em que precisava mais dessas palavras. Me fez muito bem! Me sentia muito melhor a cada capítulo. Super recomendo.

clairadise's review

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5.0

Spoke directly to many of my worries and struggles and helped me gain a fresh, new perspective. Well-worth the read.

akn94's review

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hopeful inspiring reflective

4.75

erikars's review

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3.0

I really liked this book, and I was really annoyed by this book.

The content is excellent. Brené Brown is a shame researcher, and she uses that background to give insights into what she calls "Wholehearted Living" -- living with courage, compassion, and connection. Because she is a shame researcher, she has seen how shame is a key blocker to living a whole hearted life. Unlike many self-help books and talks which claim that if you just get more of something good -- more money, more time, more prestige, a child, a house, a spouse, a cookie -- your life will be better, Brown shows that what you need is less. Less shame, less negative self talk, less perfectionism.

Thus, this had the potential to be the type of book that I like: a book that uses data to give insights into how people work. However, the writing style ends up leaning a bit toward the popular self-help style and less in the direction that I like.

If you're the type of person who tends to like books that other people say are "too academic", you'll probably be a little disappointed in this book. But if you want something that contains useful insights in a somewhat light package, you'll probably like this book. Either way, if the book sounds interesting, you'll probably get some value out of it.