Reviews

Saint Peter's Fair, by Ellis Peters

brasey's review

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adventurous mysterious medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

volare's review

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4.0

Another charming visit with Brother Cadfael and his friends.

writerlibrarian's review

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4.0

Still a very good reread. I remembered who was the culprit early on but I didn't remember why the murders occured. The abbott is as clever as I remembered. Overall, A good, solid plot grounded in the whole political era and a young woman who with her strength, her wit and strong sense of right and wrong makes things right. Two things Peters does really well.

amphipodgirl's review against another edition

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4.0

Ok, that was a good one. Suspenseful climax, and some nice moral and theological musings from Cadfael.

depizan's review against another edition

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3.0

Reread: Another where the mystery is the A plot, though the background of civil war gives us a pretty strong - though tightly related - B plot. Not only is there the question of who killed Thomas of Bristol, but the question of what he was killed for. Clearly, the merchant had something that someone wanted very badly indeed.

One thing I really like about the Cadfael series is that, unlike many mystery series set largely in one place, the books really do build off one another. Characters mentioned in one book pop up again in other books, events of books leave lasting effects on the town and surroundings. It makes for a much richer and realer feeling world. In the case of this book, the town is still recovering from being besieged back in book two, and the tension between the Abbey (which profits from the fair) and the town (which does not) partially sets the stage for the events of the book.

The different allegiances and very non-modern values around those allegiances continue to be interesting as well. The villain is terrible not just because they are a murderer, but because their murders were for their own advancement and not an allegiance to one of the claimants to the throne. Cadfael's relationship with Rhodri, a Welshman who is more than the merchant he presents himself as. The new Abbot's decisions regarding the town and the fair proceeds.

It's also the first book in which putting matters right actually involves some measure of legal justice.

jlsigman's review against another edition

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5.0

The lovely thing about all of these books is how history is intertwined into even the smallest stories, and becomes alive in a way that mere history books cannot accomplish.

mudder17's review against another edition

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3.0

3-3.5 stars

This was a decent entry in this series, but I didn't like it quite as much as the first three, possibly because I listened to it rather than reading it (I couldn't find a physical copy in any of my libraries). The narrator was decent, but not spectacular and there were times I had to go back and listen to passages. Still, I enjoyed the mystery and I liked the young man who went after the truth, partly to clear his name, but partly to help the girl. I liked watching him grow up over the course of the book. I will definitely continue with this series, but I'm going to try reading as many as I can get my hands on.

kizzia's review

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adventurous hopeful mysterious medium-paced

4.0

harper's review

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dark mysterious medium-paced

4.0

julieputty's review

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4.0

Cadfael's strong, tolerant personality makes these books comfortable and comforting, despite people being knocked off left and right.