Reviews

Abolition. Feminism. Now. by Gina Dent

laranarenee's review against another edition

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challenging hopeful informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

3.75

britlovestoread's review against another edition

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informative inspiring slow-paced
A good summary of abolition feminism and some movements that have worked towards this ideal. 

If you have already read some abolitionist texts I don't know that this really adds anything new, but it's still a good and important read. 

tmosley5's review against another edition

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challenging informative reflective medium-paced

3.5

biobeetle's review against another edition

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challenging hopeful informative medium-paced

4.25


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wildsorcerer's review against another edition

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timely and made me feel optimistic

catsteaandabook's review against another edition

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emotional informative

3.75

caileykh's review against another edition

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informative inspiring medium-paced

4.5

wellreadsinger's review against another edition

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informative reflective

5.0

Abolition.Feminism.Now provides a genealogy of abolition feminist movements/organizations throughout the years and currently. These movements exemplify how an abolitionist framework coupled with antiracist, anticapitalist feminist practice ensures that work being done is addressing the root of issues. Violence— whether it be carried out by the state, interpersonal, gender or racist— are not isolated incidents. The foundation that has been laid by radical abolition feminist organizations such as INCITE!, Critical, Resistance etc., has been crucial in the continued development of this practice. 

In the last few years there have been movements that co-opt the language of their more radical counterparts. Campaigns that speak of defunding and reform but fail to realize that defunding or reforming a corrupt system or entity only allows it to function in a more acceptable fashion. A “better” cell is still a cage. Abolition feminism seeks structural change, not temporary salves. 

Davis, Dent, Meiners, and Richie are not providing the reader with a step by step of how to utilize abolition feminism per se, but rather encouraging readers to initiate the practice now. They implore us to keep finding and implementing alternatives within our communities as we seek out change that is transformative. 

highlandcowluvr's review against another edition

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challenging hopeful informative medium-paced

4.0

cbooks95's review against another edition

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challenging inspiring reflective

5.0