neilsarver's review

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4.0

I'm not really the audience for this, so I didn't have a good way to rate it, but it makes enough really important points that I think the people for whom it is written should definitely be reading it and thinking about what it says.

laurengent's review

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hopeful informative inspiring medium-paced

3.75

Would make for a great read for a young person curious about political activism or feeling jaded and disillusioned with the status quo. 

beardedbarista's review

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5.0

Endtablebookreview of How to Start a Revolution
What an insight. I want to lead with how beneficial a book like this is for teens, young adults and probably 20 and 30 somethings. Knowledge is Power. What this book aims at more than anything really is arming people, youth particularly with information on how they can affect* political change (*someone check my usage of affect over effect, please?)
I have enjoyed following Lauren on social media and was not even aware until some point a few weeks ago she was writing a book. Well, she was nice enough to get one to me and I am so happy to share it and tell you to go buy it TODAY! It is out and available. Reading this makes me want to write or inspire someone to write something for kids even younger. It seems like that is the best place to start? But obviously as unbiased and face based as possible. I am sure some kids out there are definitely getting ear fulls of political one sidedness no matter red or blue. But damn... I have an 11 year old nephew that could benefit from this knowledge. This book might just be a bit over his head. Anyway... loved reading this.
5 out of 5 beers

samanthaash_'s review

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hopeful informative reflective fast-paced

3.25

missamandamae's review

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5.0

I like reading about people in my age demographic being activists and finding their voice. Many Millennials struggle with standing up for themselves, and recognizing that they have a voice, or thinking they're not worthy of attention or acclaim or even being listened to. This book was a reassuring and empowering read to remember many enraging events of the last few years and remembering how I felt when they happened, and taking that rage and frustration and channeling it into something ACTIVE that can produce change.

I appreciate the overreaching arc of the author discussing her relationship with her conservative-leaning parents, and the struggles they encountered being able to interact with each other and discuss politics in a level-headed way, and both learning new strategies for being able to do that in our extremely heated political environment. She ends with concrete steps to young people of how they can prep themselves to be more involved politically and stand up for themselves as needed.

I recommend this book to anyone who doesn't know where to begin with getting better informed and knowing what next steps they can take.

kaydeelew's review

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1.0

I think the author had good intentions but for me this fell flat.

chinesa72's review

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challenging hopeful informative inspiring medium-paced

3.5

editrix's review

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Abandoning. I’m not the right audience for the information (most of it is fairly basic/obvious), and it’s not written well enough that it’s interesting/entertaining to me.

_talia's review

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5.0

Incredibly sharp but also hilarious. Duca manages to weave important concepts with humor. We need collective action, now more than ever. It’s imperative for us to perform whatever civic duties we can, our democracy requires it, and we owe it to each other.

shelfiegen's review

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4.0

we definitely have different definitions of a "revolution" but I dont know, I like/appreciate Duca's work...