Reviews

This is Where I Leave You by Jonathan Tropper

gorgug's review against another edition

Go to review page

2.0

This is one of the few instances the movie is better than the book. I’ve lived the movie for years and was excited to learn it was adapted from a novel.
Props to the creative direction the movie took to not include the disgusting misogyny Tropper obsesses over throughout the entire book. The actors/crew turn these half fleshed out characters and turn them into funny and sympathetic people.
It’s really unfortunate because the plot actually has legs to be really interesting and comedic (again something the movie excels at) but instead we get a whiny and pathetic middle aged man that critiques every single woman’s appearance and assigns worth based on how much he wants to sleep with them, including his sister and mother.
Skip the book just watch the movie instead of wasting your time reading horrible, judgmental sex scenes every few paragraphs.

rainbowbookworm's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

I loved this tale of family disfunction at its finest. Join the Foxmans as they sit shiva for their departed patriarch and watch find yourself drawn to all the family drama. You'll gasp, you'll cry... you might even tear up as you read this one.

timna_wyckoff's review against another edition

Go to review page

3.0

Enjoyed the movie....didn't feel the book had much more to offer. I guess that means it was a good movie :)

lulo49's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

I enjoyed this performance on Audible --funny, irreverent, ironic, and reminiscent of how awkward dynamics with family, friends, and others can be. Of course none of my experiences come close to the oddness of this family who sits a full 7-day shiva for their father, enforced by the rabbi, a former classmate of the brothers who refer to him by his schoolyard nickname, Boner, and their sex therapist mother, When siblings, spouses, and offspring are forced to be in the same house together for a week so many things that haven't been said or shared start to surface. It's hilarious.

summerluvn78's review against another edition

Go to review page

2.0

I was immediately drawn in by the idea of the book: a family -- four siblings -- mourning the death of their father, coming together for seven days to sit shiva. The book promised to be witty and biting, an unforgiving look at family dynamic. Bottom line I didn't enjoy the book from Judd's point of view. I skimmed more than I actually read and at the end I literally jumped up and screamed WHAT THE HELL THAT WAS IT, sigh

anovelobsession's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

Jonathan Tropper is one of my favorite authors. All of his characters to me feel like somebody I want to hang out with. This one was a little off the wall, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. Gave it four stars because nothing has compared to his first novel, The Book of Joe.

tetedump's review against another edition

Go to review page

lighthearted fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.0


Expand filter menu Content Warnings

laneylane573's review

Go to review page

emotional funny lighthearted sad slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5

teresaalice's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

It's been a long time since I've read a book that reminds me of the first time I picked up a Richard Russo. Alternately laughing and crying, I finished this book way too fast for my liking.

mrsbear's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

The book open with the death of Mort Foxman. His dying wish was for his family to sit shiva for him even though they were never a religious family. The siblings come home and are all together for seven days, spending more time together then they have in years.

This is not your normal family. Judd Foxman, the main character is separated, his wife left him for his boss, his mother is an aging parenting expert, his sister Wendy is stuck in marriage with no emotion, his brother Paul and his wife are having infertility problems and Phillip the youngest who has never grown up shows up with his "cougar" girlfriend.

This was my first book by this author and won't be my last. I found it to be an easy and very enjoyable read. There were as many laugh out loud moments as there were touching moments. The characters could be from almost any of our families and for me, it was in some crazy dysfunctional way like looking into the mirror!

I would recommend This Is Where I Leave You to anyone who enjoys a good laugh and a good story. I look forward to reading the rest of Jonathan Tropper's books.