Reviews

Aikatunneli, by Greg Bear, Eero Mänttäri

leftoverjen's review against another edition

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5.0

someone remind me to fill this in later cause this book was awesome

tome15's review against another edition

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4.0

Bear, Greg. Eon. The Way No. 1. Tor, 1985.
It is the 1985 version of 2005. The Soviet Union is still in power. Russia, China and the United States have well-established space programs capable of sending large numbers of people to visit a large asteroid that suddenly appears in an eccentric Earth orbit. They quickly discover that the rock is hollow and that it is a good deal larger on the inside than it is on the outside. It seems to have come from a timeline in Earth’s future. So begins Greg Bear’s Eon. There are several strongly developed characters and several that are little better than cardboard cutouts. The science is not badly thought out, as if ten-years down the road Bear wants to rewrite Arthur C. Clarke’s Rendezvous with Rama so that we discover that we are the aliens. The politics seem to come straight out of a Tom Clancy novel, which should not surprise us since The Hunt for Red October was published just months before Eon. Indeed, there is one Russian military officer that reminds me strongly of Captain Ramius. There are several very good scenes, but the plot could stand some tightening up. On the whole, the book is very much a creature of its time but still an enjoyable read.

futuregazer's review against another edition

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5.0

Will attempt to return later and write a real review later, but for now: Awesome!

kejadlen's review against another edition

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4.0

Really liked it as I was reading, but at the end, I was left a little unsatisfied. Loved the SF aspect, but the plot was lacking. 3.5 stars.

internpepper's review against another edition

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3.0

This book starts off very strong with a great premise, but unfortunately it gets way too caught up in exposition dumps and fairly generic characters. I do like the plot itself and the implications of the science, which I know is the point of classic science fiction. However, the middle and ending portion just dragged too much to be truly great.

joeyh's review against another edition

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4.0

This is the only SF book I know of where pi-meters are used. I loved that, and have always wanted a pi-meter of my own.

mike_no1's review against another edition

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3.0

Sadly the poor quality of my copy of the audiobook brings the score down. Very "Crichtonian" plot and thats not bad, just very 90's.

tomwklose's review against another edition

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3.0

The beginning had a lot of promise even into the middle of the book, but the end began to have me lose interest because of losing track along the way. I agree it reminded me of Clark's book too.

craniac's review against another edition

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4.0

Rather compelling remake of Clarke's Rendesvouz with Rama. It really needed to be three books, perhaps, as too much happened in the last third of the book, and a bit too quickly to really engage me. Theoretical time/space science becomes the magic pixie dust that makes everything possible in the last portion of this book, but I still enjoyed it, even what I had a hard time visualizing.

Why aren't hard science fiction writers allowed to use illustrations? It seems archaic and lame to have to describe some of the complex concepts and spaces in this book without diagrams of any sort. What, are we playing dungeons and dragons? I say that as a technical writing teacher.

greenspe's review against another edition

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3.0

Doris Lessing really likes Greg Bear. I really like Doris Lessing. So far, this is okay.