Reviews

Becoming Dangerous: Witchy Femmes, Queer Conjurers, and Magical Rebels, by

annarodimtseva's review

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5.0

This the most empowering book I have read in a long time. It's not just another collection of essays bemoaning the injustice of our patriarchal world. It's also not your usual new age book about pagans, wiccan, and white girls who just really really like crystals. This is a collection of essays about womxn asserting power. Reading this reminded me of my powers and rituals I never bothered to assign any weight to. Becoming Dangerous reminded me that dedication, intention, and radical selfcare are forces of resistance in the face of all that is bad and oppressive. Taking ugly selfies, masturbating in the bath, letting ocean waves heal you, having a fucking killer wardrobe, overcoming mommy issues to reclaim family traditions, and just being really ritualistic with doing your own nails. To name just a few bullet points of modern witchcraft and female power! I'm going forward with the will to call my rituals by their proper name.

laryssa's review

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My favorite essay in this book was Ritualizing My Humanity by J.A. Micheline. She does a great job of explaining how many white cis women are putting on witchy or monster-like personas in order to navigate white patriarchy while at the same time blacK people have to shake idea that they are monsterous or dangerous in order to survive. The essay put into words some of my uncomfortable feelings I have about modern day American witch culture. Many of the other essays good and talked about interesting and/or serious topics.

jet's review

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emotional hopeful informative reflective medium-paced

4.0

jenjuniper80's review against another edition

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5.0

Oh I loved this so much. I don't often read essay collections, but I'm glad I picked this one up. Even if you are not into "witchy" topics (which most of the essays in this collection center around), if you have ever felt marginalized for your skin color, gender identity, sexual identity, body type, etc. there will be something in here that may resonate with you. This book is more than just about social justice and witchcraft - this is about those who feel helpless finding ways to reclaim their power in the best way that they can. Highly recommended.

faeriekit's review

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challenging dark emotional hopeful inspiring mysterious reflective sad slow-paced

4.0

This book was hard for me to read though-- anthologies usually test my patience. Sometimes I failed to see the connection between all the stories, but that was mainly because I couldn't connect to all of them at once. That's not the book's fault. It still made for an odd reading experience, though. 

As far as the witchcraft goes, I can see some connections, and I miss others. That's fine. Not every craft is like mine, not every magic matches what I know. As far as the Queer and Disabled community connections go, though, the intertwining of knowing your exiled status and looking in from the outside was something that tied the majority of stories together in ways that the individual contents of each piece didn't. 

I do think this is a deeply interesting book. It brings many undervalued voices to light in a community that often sees gender roles as spiritual, and an unmovable facet of the divine. It's nice to see the reminder that the human failings of prejudice have to fall away in order to see the full breadth and scope of what witchcraft, magic, and ancestral love can look like. I would recommend finding a copy to read. 

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mad_taylh's review against another edition

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4.0

"I've always been active in social justice activism. I've been to hundreds of protests, donated money to causes, organized, and worked towards a better world. I didn't push as hard as I could. I would protest, but avoid arrest. I would stand my ground, but be afraid for my physical safety. I would voice my opinions, but surely I would never hit anyone. I would never advocate violence.

And now?

Punch Nazis. Punch them literally and figuratively. Make them afraid. Drive them back into the miserable hell they so clearly want to live in. Destroy even the possibility that their ideologies might be tolerated."

midwestpriestess's review

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challenging dark emotional hopeful inspiring medium-paced

4.0

iilk's review against another edition

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5.0

This book is raw and emotional and beautiful. It is painful and empowering at the same time. Some essays delver deeper into witchcraft and some focus more on politics, mental health, or self care. "The Harpy" was a particularly difficult chapter to get through due to it covering PTSD, sexual violence, and death.

weewaa13's review

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5.0

Every single one of these essays made me Feel something. There’s so much valuable knowledge that can only come from many different perspectives, and I’ve learned not only about myself, but about others’ experiences and ways of life, both equally important.

rejecteddounut's review against another edition

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3.0

At it's core, this book is about self-care, loving yourself, and navigating the world when you're at one of the most emotional moments in your life.

There are several essays in this book and all of them are unique and important to the individual that wrote it. Some of them had to do with spells and rituals; some of them had to do with, basically, amping yourself up into the beautiful person that you are. And some of them involved a person healing from the trauma that they'd experienced in the past--whether that be abuse, sexual assault, a difficult family life, or what have you.

It was an interesting read for sure.