Reviews

The Power and the Glory, by Graham Greene

andrew61's review

Go to review page

4.0

The variety and depth of work produced by Graham greene never ceases to amaze me as does his ability to create a story in just over 200pages which in a modern author would stretch to over 500.
I was completely lost in the world of a whisky priest in a Mexico where a dictatorship either shoots clerics or forces them to renounce their faith and marry. In a narrative evocative of the journey if christ (including the return by donkey , his own judas ,and a police lieutenant who must decide his fate) our flawed hero tries to escape but by the end accepts a fate to answer for his sins.
A story of human frailties, of the strength or weakness of faith, this is a remarkable book which will live with me for some time although it is a sad tale as well with little redemption at the end.

mistermisslonelyhearts's review

Go to review page

reflective tense medium-paced

4.25

pjsontheoutside's review

Go to review page

2.0

Read this for a college banned books class. Eh, it was OK.

eandomom's review

Go to review page

I really enjoyed this book.  I started reading with the thought that I would likely abandon it after a few chapters, as I am not a fan of anything that even hints of sci-fi. . . but the futuristic elements of this book were another layer of interesting. . . I enjoyed the book, futuristic parts and all.

vstewart76's review

Go to review page

4.0

I always tell myself I should read more Graham Greene. I love the short story "The Destructors" as well as the novel 'Brighton Rock'. This book is like neither of those. It's beautifully written and Greene allows the atmosphere (the humidity, the insects, the sun) seep into every page of the novel. This is the story of a hunted, and haunted, priest on the run from the law while battling with his own conscience. It's a taut journey full of theological and ethical questions and well worth the read.

ben_smitty's review

Go to review page

4.0

Graham Greene is a famous Catholic novelist of the 20th century, and The Power and the Glory deals with a flawed priest who despises himself for his cowardice as he runs from his past mistakes and future martyrdom.

I honestly thought this was a great story, but I just can't relate to the whisky priest as a protagonist because of his self-hatred, which is something I don't really deal with.

Greene has been compared to Endo (or vice versa?) multiple times in scholarship because both deal with the topic of "bad priests" and "flawed saints." I think that Greene reads a little smoother, probably because Endo's works are translated. Still, I like Endo a little more because of the cultural dimension he brings in to his novels.

hannahcathie's review

Go to review page

5.0

This book is troubling and sad and wonderful. There is one passage in this book where the main character is described as having a concsience like a faulty slot machine; any coin will work. I can't do it the justice it deserves, but I read the book over 5 years ago and that image still resonates so much with me. I just remember parts of this book reached out and physically grabbed me. At the same time though, some bits were so frustrating I just wanted them to be finished! Not a book you will forget.

doctortdm's review

Go to review page

2.0

Had high hopes for this book based on reviews, struggled to care about the story without a plot and no character development. The constant switching between characters only added to the burden of reading a narrative that didn't draw me in to the story.

ericaceae's review

Go to review page

4.0

Good story, but the imagery was clunky, and sorting out what the author meant to say kept me from really getting fully invested into the tale. Really nice insight into the heart of Roman Catholocism.

vel33's review

Go to review page

3.0

I can see why Greene is well-renowned, but I’m not sure I was the audience for this particular book. I did listen to it on audiobook which may have affected my impression.