Reviews

Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism, by bell hooks

thoughtsfromtheafro's review against another edition

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5.0

I know most about feminism, so the last two chapters didn’t do as much for me as the first three, but they are still oh so valuable.

The criticisms and pointing out of complicity of white women and black men in upholding racism, sexism/patriarchy, and colonization/imperialism is...*chef’s kiss*. bell does not mince any words. The arguments are scathing and may seem like a slight, but history and actions prove them true.

chonkooch's review

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challenging informative reflective sad slow-paced

5.0

erinlcrane's review against another edition

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4.0

Something I am thinking about after reading this book - white women should have shown solidarity with black women in their fight to get the vote, even if that meant setbacks and maybe not getting the vote as soon. That should probably not feel revelatory.

broiledink's review against another edition

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4.0

read for womxn’s day <3

luciebouchett's review against another edition

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4.0

important !!

(+super préface)

ofbooksandtrees's review against another edition

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 Read July 2021 

setarehxx's review against another edition

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5.0

Really really eye opening, insightful, intellectual book. Easy to read and understand and I learnt a lot. I highlighted so much! Bell hook is a great writer and I’m looking forward to reading more of her work.

paigeburnett's review against another edition

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5.0

“The sisterhood that is necessary for the making of feminist revolution can be achieved only when all women disengage themselves from the hostility, jealousy, and competition with one another that has kept us vulnerable, weak, and unable to envision new realities. That sisterhood cannot be forged by the mere saying of words. It is the outcome of continued growth and change. It is a goal to be reached, a process of becoming. The process begins with action. With the individual woman’s refusal to accept any set of myths, stereotypes, and assumptions that deny the shared commonness of her human experience. That deny her capacity to experience the unity of all life. That deny her capacity to bridge gaps created by racism, sexism, or classism. That deny her ability to change.”

gewaechshausgeist's review

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challenging informative reflective fast-paced

4.0

coreym's review

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challenging informative reflective slow-paced

3.5