Reviews tagging 'Toxic relationship'

Jonathan Abernathy You Are Kind by Molly McGhee

3 reviews

slefebvre95's review against another edition

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adventurous dark emotional funny mysterious reflective sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.75


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savvylit's review

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dark emotional mysterious reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

Jonathan Abernathy You Are Kind is a truly terrific anti-work novel. In writing this, McGhee has created an uncomfortable sci-fi setting that feels nearly plausible and also perfectly illustrates the pitfalls of unethical employment. Abernathy as protagonist is a comically gullible and often unlikable young man. His naivete tiptoes the line between believability and satire in a way that kept me riveted throughout. Clearly, McGhee has a deep understanding of American work culture and the desperation that many feel when it comes to finding literally ANY job that may offer a sliver of stability. Though the job that Abernathy accepts is fantastical in nature, it serves as a perfect stand-in for any one of the myriad jobs in this country that ask employees to give up way too much of themselves.

Thank you @astrahousebooks for the advance reader copy of Jonathan Abernathy You Are Kind in exchange for my honest review! All thoughts and opinions are my own.

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emzjams's review against another edition

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dark emotional funny mysterious reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.25

Have you ever been used by capitalism under the guise of opportunity? 

Jonathan Abernathy is a down-on-his-luck, 25-year-old "failure". He's never held a real job and is barely getting by, living with the constant, crushing reminder of student loan debt and (illegally - unbeknownst to him) inherited debt from his parent's deaths that he cannot pay. 

He gets an offer from a government loan forgiveness program to work as he sleeps, auditing the dreams of the working class and marking any "unsavory bits" that may interfere with their ability to work. 

He has certain affirmations that he tells himself, while not really believing it, that get him through the day- 

Jonathan Abernathy, 
You are kind.
You are loved. 
You are a valued member of this community. 

While things seem to be looking up for him -his relationship with his neighbor, the enigmatic Rhoda, is blossoming- the dream auditor position is proving to be something far more sinister than he could've imagined.

As his reality begins to shift around him he finds that he's losing more than he's gaining, and the further he moves up the corporate ladder, the more there is at stake. 

This was truly a gem. Surreal, lovely, and a bit gruesome at times, it felt very <i>Sorry To Bother You</i>-esque. Abernathy is likable, yet realistic. He makes bad decisions, feels sorry for himself more often than not, doesn't say what he knows he should, yet constantly imagines the outcome of the unsaid words. I found myself consistently interested in his story throughout, it felt fresh; something I haven't been getting lately. It never felt predictable, and while it gets a bit sporadic, I think it added to the overall sense of dread and loss of reality. I could see myself rereading this, I really enjoyed it! 

The narrator for the audiobook was amazing, really made it come alive.

Thank you so much to NetGalley and the publisher for early access to this audiobook! Now available as of Oct. 31, 2023.

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