Reviews

Trail of Lightning, by Rebecca Roanhorse

indigo_han's review against another edition

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4.0

Firstly, thank you to the lovelies from the Into the Stacks Bookcast for the recommendation.
Secondly, thank you to Rebecca Roanhorse for such a strongly and more importantly well written Own Voice novel.

I love the fact that the MC is layered, bitchy, fallible, and sometimes too tough for her own good.
I love the fact that Dine (Navaho) legend and socio-cosmic world view is a strong part of the world building. I’ve read more than one book with a MC who is Native American, but they all tend to be written by white women. Learning about the stories is different from having them be part of your ontological world view.
I love a trickster. I’ve said this before, and I’ll say it again. And I won’t spoil anything, but, oh dear Coyote, what have you done!
What I love especially is the fact that a cataclysmic event has occurred, and it’s not the privileged white dudes in skyscrapers who have survived and thrived, it’s the people who were shoved off in to reservations, literally into the margins, who found away to tap into ancestral power to save themselves. Of course a lot of other things came too, more dangerous things. The kind of things that make for excellent reading.

4.5/ 5 Stars. This is a world that I would very much like to revisit. Luckily I only have......ten.....months. Ten months? Uh oh.

bridgette's review against another edition

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5.0

THIS WAS AMAZING.

I loved pretty much everything about this. Maggie is an awesome, flawed, terrible, wonderful character. She's standoffish and a monsterslayer and slowly starts to let people in. Then, there's Kai. I did not think I would like it, but I ended up LOVING him (he's a bit of the Lovable Rogue trope, which I've learned is one of my favorites).

The world building is superb. A climate induced apocalypse, complete with a Wall diving parts of the country, and bonus points! the monsters are back! It reminds me a little of the better parts of Supernatural.

This is a book about slaying monsters, but there's really just the dressing. There's so much about what makes a person a monster, and how and why someone could start to believe they're monstrous. It's also really, deeply about learning what love it--love from others and love you have for yourself and how one impacts the other. There's so much about toxic and abusive behaviors that are presented as love but aren't.

The ending was the best. It's not all wrapped up and while there's an awesome character arc and growth, it isn't finished. Maggie realized some things about herself, but it's all messy still, exactly how real life is.

frogggirl2's review against another edition

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4.0

This is set in a post-apocalyptic America in which one of the few surviving areas is Native American land. The combination of post-apocalyptica and the Native American culture and mythology is really fascinating. There's a lot of rich symbolism here and an interesting story. The characterization are a the little lackluster - particularly the main character. That being said, this is a fast, compelling read and I would like to read more books in this universe.

maestrolatinx's review against another edition

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4.0

I love the Navajo lore that weaves this story together. I enjoyed the journey more than the twists and turns. I could tell that Mags and the Monsterslayer have a turbulent relationship but it was interesting to peel the layers back. This has the tone of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and True Blood but completely it’s own.

laikiaroo's review against another edition

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4.0

Postapocalyptic climate disaster setting + monsters + native = awesomeness

geeky_spider's review against another edition

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adventurous dark medium-paced

4.0

magneto's review against another edition

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adventurous dark mysterious fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

onceuponarachel's review against another edition

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5.0

I really liked this. It reminded me a lot of Children of Blood and Bone, similar concepts but centered around Diné / Navajo people. I'm sad it's not more famous, I think people would like this.

PopSugar 2019: "A cli-fi book."

mannis's review

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adventurous dark sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5

gilbertbg1's review against another edition

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5.0

Mild Spoilers below!

The Good:

Just... the whole book!! If you enjoy speculative fic, dystopian fiction, urban fantasy, mythology, and a little bit of a supernatural vibe, this book will knock your freaking SOCKS off. Rebecca Roanhorse creates an insane post apocalyptic future, a world ravaged by floods and natural disaster, full of all of the monsters, creatures, and magic you could want. Gritty, realistic characters, exciting plot twists, and stunning use of the magic that the author has woven into the story, this book is a winner on every level.

The World Building! An urban fantasy with strong Navajo influences worked into the mythology and the magic of the story, its totally unique to anything I've read before, and its excellent. A world ravaged by climate change, The Sixth World is raw, gritty, and lived in, full of characters who are just regular people, touched by magic. No princes or palaces here, just regular people, making their way through their lives in a dystopian future. We don't see much outside of the walled off section of the world that Maggie lives in, but even with just her own retelling of the end of the world, we see an interesting picture growing. Here's hoping that in the next book we get to step outside of the Wall and into the unknown!

Maggie and Kai! Told from the first person POV of Maggie, our heroine, this book is full of internal conflicts and emotional struggles that add a lot of nuance and layer to the overall story. Maggie is traumatized and at war with herself and her own identity, both hating and clinging to a part of herself that she tries to keep from everyone else. She feels a lot of shame, for a lot of reasons, but never doubts her own abilities or her strength. She's headstrong, stubborn, full of fire, and extremely slow to trust, but, because we get to see inside her head, you see that what she feels goes deeper than she lets anyone see. She's a riveting main character and it's an exciting journey to go on with her.

Kai is an enigma, partially because he hides a lot from Maggie, and partially because she closes herself off to him, making him mysterious and hard to read. He's a great sidekick, though, and Roanhorse does an amazing job of weaving in just enough hints and little moments where an observant reader will see what she's building to, even if Maggie refuses to let herself fully grasp who and what he is. He's charismatic, charming, and he works well as a test of Maggie's own worst impulses, trying to teach her to be more than she believes she can be while still maintaining his own mystery and secrets. He's an easy character to love, and I'm excited to see whats next for him.

The Meh:

Overall, not much to 'meh' about! The plot is exciting and attention grabbing, the characters are intriguing and have complex inner stories, the mythology and the fantasy elements are well used and SO cool! There are some things that could have stood for a little deeper exploration , or a little more foreshadowing, but not much! Loved this book, and I quickly added the next in the series AND the authors other book to my library holds! Definitely recommend!