brittaniethekid's review against another edition

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3.0

I was a little disappointed in this collection. I guess I interpreted "inspired by" to mean more Holmes canon based stories and not just any story that had some Holmes or Doyle reference in it. Only a few stories actually features Holmes or other characters from Doyle's canon - which is what I was looking for in this type of collection.
[a:Neil Gaiman|1221698|Neil Gaiman|http://photo.goodreads.com/authors/1234150163p2/1221698.jpg]'s story was by far the best, in my opinion. If you read any of these stories, definitely check that one out. I wanted it to keep going!

If you like Sherlock Holmes stories because of the mystery and suspense, you would enjoy this. However, if you're like me and enjoy the canon more for the characters and their interactions than the plots, only a few of these will interest you. Support your local library and check it out there instead of buying.

jeremychiasson's review against another edition

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1.0

Basically amateurish Sherlock fanfiction, with the exception of Neil Gaiman's lovely little story.

mcbenzie's review against another edition

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4.0

It's hard to imagine a better collection of Holmes inspired stories, running the gamut from "lost" stories from Holmes' career, reimaginings of his cases in other times and places, or investigations by those inspired by the detective and even tales of Holmes fans and one featuring Conan Doyle himself. In fact Holmes appears in only five of the fifteen stories, and in one of those (a comic about the author's inability to complete a Holmes short story) he is barely a cameo - but this is the book's strength. Of the Holmes stories only one (The Startling Events in the Electrified City) imitates the Watsonian style of the originals, and while it is by no means a failure it feels out of place among the more inventive interpretations around it. That said, there's not really a dud in the list, and the less successful ones probably seem worse than they are amongst the gems.

Of the authors included only one was familiar to me, Neil Gaiman, and his tale - like his award-winning Holmes and Cthulhu mash up "A Study in Emerald" - shows a love and understanding of the character alongside a willingness to risk taking him in a new direction. It works splendidly. Other characters who take on the mantle of Holmes - however briefly or obliquely - are also largely successful. Sme of them are probably familiar to crime readers, but since Holmes is more or less the only crime I've read, they were all new to me.

I was a little surprised at the American focus of the novel; a large part of my (and I suspect many others') attraction to aholmes is the Victorian world he inhabits, but here most of the non-Holmes stories are set in America, and one or two set in the UK onvolve Americans too. This wasn't much of a barrier though because the stories are so good, though the cultural references sometimes had me wondering what happened to all the English Sherlockians who surely would have loved a stab at this format.

All in all, I loved it. It's inspired me to return to the canon for the first time in a while, too.

foxwrapped's review against another edition

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4.0

These aren't straight pastiches, but I love that about it. But it has the same problem that plagues short story collections; some stories you like, some stories you don't. I like Neil Gaiman's (and that story actually was a pretty straightforward pastiche, if a little... Neil Gaiman-y), and the collection did introduce me to some mystery writers I have heard about but haven't read yet (like Alan Bradley, Dana Stabenow, and Jacqueline Winspear) who did pretty decent stories. The one story that I hated was the comic by Colin Cotterill, but only because it wasn't my sense of humor at all. What is my sense of humor? I have been told that I'm "the funny one" and also that I don't have a sense of humor at all. HAHAHA!!!

stephgraves's review against another edition

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4.0

A couple of misfires, one story that I couldn't quite puzzle out why it was included (inserting the name 'Holmes' does NOT make it a Sherlock Holmes story), but overall a wonderful collection of short stories related to the Holmes canon. The Alan Bradley and Neil Gaiman stories in particular stand out, both beautiful and slightly sad, just the way I like 'em.

lem119's review

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3.0

So apparently the editor of this story collection writes a series in which a fifteen-year-old girl impresses Sherlock Holmes's so much that she becomes his protégé, and some years later they get married. That's... okay, I'm pretty sure I could read that same thing on fanfiction.net. But credentials of the editor aside, let's talk about the stories, which range from awful to excellent. I'll start with the ones I liked: my favourite was probably "The Case of the Purloined Paget" by Phillip and Jerry Margolin. While several of the stories focus on non-Holmes characters performing Sherlock Holmes-esque detective work, this one was the best at connecting their work with the spirit of the Sherlock Holmes stories. I also loved Neil Gaiman's "The Case of Death and Honey," maybe even more than his previous Holmes-story (the Lovecraft mashup "A Study in Emerald.") Also, "The Adventure of the Concert Pianist" by Margaret Maron, in which Watson and Mrs. Hudson solve a case just before "The Adventure of the Empty House," and "The Case that Holmes Lost," which connects author and character into an interesting mystery with a surprising conclusion.

On the other hand, some of the stories were downright terrible. One seemed to demonstrate less of the author's writing skills and more of his ability to use IMDB; a commentary on all of the actors who have played Holmes over the years is neither a mystery nor a story. Additionally, there were several stories that seemed to have no relation to Holmes at all beyond a vague "this is deduction" type of plot resolution, and one or two of the stories that do feature Holmes don't really seem to relate to him as a character but simply as a name (the story about Holmes saving President McKinley from assassination is an interesting one, but doesn't feature any of the traits for which Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's detective is famous). As a whole, I would say that this collection is worth checking out for any die-hard Sherlockian, but don't be afraid to skim or skip through any story that rubs you the wrong way (and definitely don't bother to read the bizarre twitter-RP transcript between one of the editors and the aforementioned Holmes-wife-Mary-Sue-whatever).

I would probably rate this lower than three stars overall, but I'm marking it up slightly for the stories I mentioned in paragraph one, because I really did love them a lot, and several others were fairly decent at least.

choicelight's review against another edition

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3.0

I really wanted to love this book, but the only story a truly loved was Neil Gaiman's story. It felt like he understood Holmes, even after he retired and decided to keep bees. Gaiman's story was beautifully paced and really captured the essence that is Sherlock Holmes.

moveslikewind's review against another edition

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1.0

Unfortunately, many of the stories included in this book reminded me of poorly-written fan-fiction. I would not suggest this to anyone.

astrangerhere's review against another edition

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3.0

2.5/5. Started off well but really went down hill in the back half.

holtfan's review against another edition

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3.0

Being something of a Sherlockian, Janeite, and Tutor-era purist, I tend to avoid anthologies like A Study in Sherlock. In fact, I tend to avoid fan fiction or spin-offs in general. With some exceptions, the Enola Holmes series by Nancy Springer being an excellent example, they never quite meet my expectations. It is like the old saying ‘the movie is never as good as the book’, but in this case, ‘the re-telling is never as good as the cannon.’
A Study in Sherlock edited by Laurie R. King and Leslie S. Klinger is a collection of short stories inspired by Sherlock Holmes and written by “some of the greatest mystery writers of our time…” Actually, I’ve never heard of any of them so I’m slightly skeptical. That might be more of my fault as a reader than the authors.
Anyway! As far as anthologies go, A Study in Sherlock was rather interesting. Or at least, it had some good stories. “As to ‘An Exact Knowledge of London’” and “The Case of Death and Honey” were my personal favorites. “The Eyak Interpreter” and “The Case That Holmes Lost” were interesting. “The Adventures of the Concert Pianist” was interesting but oh-so-predictable. It was an interesting mix, really. Some of the stories were good and I plan on finding more by the authors. Others were dumb. “The Mysterious Case of the Unwritten Short Story” really wasn’t to my taste.
Overall, an interesting collection that I mostly enjoyed as a good yarn. It re-peaked my interest in that fabulous detective, Sherlock Holmes. It was interesting to see the various authors and the differences in their ideas, interpretation of how a short story should deal with Sherlock Holmes, and writing styles. It also introduced me to a wealth of new authors with a great deal , hopefully, of potential. Thus, while I don’t necessarily recommend this book, I don’t not recommend it. Some of the short stories were down-right clever. Others were depressing or dumb. Some were predictable. When you get this many authors together, you certainly can’t expect every story to be fabulous. Thus, interesting but not fantabulous.