Reviews

Princess Floralinda and the Forty-Flight Tower, by Tamsyn Muir

jkap's review

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5.0

it's honestly so much fun to see tamsyn muir working outside the locked tomb and playing with the conventions of a different genre. floralinda just makes me even more excited to see what she does next.

jitsumi1221's review against another edition

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5.0

This Audiobook was so freaking delightful. I spent a lot of time just cackling to myself in my room as I was doing chores and listening to the story being read to me. The narrator (Moira Quirk) was fantastic and Tamsyn Muir has the most wonderfully dark sense of humor. If you like old tropes being spun upon their heads and surprise laughs at things that aren’t supposed to be humorous - this is a pretty amazing read. This reminded me a bunch of ‘The Enchanted Forest Chronicles’ by Patricia C. Wrede but aimed at an older audience and kinda mean. I love that this is a fairy tale that starts exactly as it should and then slowly slowly morphs into something so much better.

kemory's review

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adventurous funny lighthearted

4.75

mcaliz's review

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adventurous lighthearted fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

1.5

All I can really say is that this was interesting? It was nice to see "the Damsel in Distress" be the one that saved herself instead of waiting for a Prince. But other than that this was just "okay." 

I wasn't a big fan about what the author was trying to about gender roles, and what it means to be a "girl" or a "boy" or a "princess" or "prince" given what the story was about. I do think that Muir was trying to subvert stereotypical tropes about gender roles/characteristics, but I don't think it was executed well in this. And how one of the characters that we meet in here, Cobweb, who's a fairy (and we learn that fairies are gender fluid &/or trans) HAD to be a girl in Floralinda's eyes, when that's not how Cobweb saw themselves.

So I can see how some would love this, but I just think that this did not do the job that it was trying to do.

yerrawizardkari's review

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5.0

I love Tamsyn Muir and everything she's ever done. That said, this was a super fun story about flipping a fairy tale on its head. Incredibly enjoyable.

crowkettle's review

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3.0

A little repetitive around the midway point but good subversive fun as a whole! Dark, twisted, claustrophobic, and snarky (so like Tamsyn Muir's other works).

ennakym's review

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4.0

Snarky and fun, this is a quick read with a delightful audiobook narrator.

hellomellohello's review

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5.0

What a fun and unexpected read. Floralinda is all right with me.

ladyaleira's review

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5.0

This is exactly as bizarre and unsettling a fairy tale as you would expect from Tamsyn Muir and I deeply enjoyed it.

colossal's review

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5.0

A brilliant short novella about Princess Floralinda and her struggle once a witch steals her away to a tower with forty flights of monsters. The witch wants Floralinda to be rescued by a prince, but when twenty-four of them come and fail at the first floor where they're eaten by a diamond-encrusted dragon, Floralinda has no choice but to make her way down. With the aid of a helpful but surly fairy, she soon has success and slowly makes her way down.

This is full of the author's trademark irreverent humor that's on display in her Locked Tomb books. Floralinda is a very ordinary princess at the start of her ordeal, but with a clever choice and a brilliant partnership she grows into her mission, leading to a fantastic punchline for the whole story.

Recommended.