Reviews tagging Homophobia

Freshwater, by Akwaeke Emezi

11 reviews

lilymurph's review

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dark emotional reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0


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miles's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional reflective tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0


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miri_png's review

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dark emotional
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0


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anovelbeauty's review

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challenging dark emotional tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.75

Book TW: ❗️attempted suicide (on-page); rape (on-page)❗️abuse; eating disorder; repeated self-harm/mutilation; manipulation; involuntary hospitalisation

There’s a /lot/ to this novel. So much in fact, I almost feel I can’t write a decent review for it. I learned a lot through this novel, specifically about the Nigerian concept of ognanje. I know many aspects of this novel are also inspired by Emezi’s own experiences with their gender. Freshwater is extremely well written. It is beautiful and harsh, it unflinchingly explores a lot of deep and hurtful topics and let’s you draw your own conclusions about any one character’s morality (or lack thereof) and choices. 
Now, I do want to say, right up front, that this novel scared me. It didn’t really start until the emergence of Asughara or “The Beast Self.” Maybe I should just say that Asyghara scares me? But her perspective is so prevalent in the novel and is such a dark influence within Ada’s life experience in the book, it is often manipulative, harmful, and abusive, punctuated by a rare few moments where she actually does protect Ada, but that doesn’t outweigh the bad. But essentially a spirit having that much negative impact and control over Ada freaked me out in the same way that demon possession plots are just a thing I cannot do in movies and books. It just is too real and freaks me out (I realize this is a me problem, but I still wanted to mention it). 
That aside, the plot of the book was very well developed as it walked you through Ada’s life and with the perspectives of the Brothersisters and Asughara throughout. I do wish that we got St. Vincent’s POV as I felt that would have perhaps provided a better balance to Asughara’s chapters. The few times we get Ada and the “We” perspectives are always fascinating. 
This book explores a lot of Nigerian spirituality, both traditional and Christianised. The way that Yshwa (Jesus) is portrayed in the novel is interesting and definitely touching at points. He is woven throughout the novel as Ada works through her faith and her experiences clashing and rebuilding throughout her life. 
This is also a novel of genderfluidity. As the brothersisters inhabit Ada and exert their influence on her, she becomes more ogbanje than human, more they than she over the course of the story. 
From a mental health perspective there is /a lot/ to unpack. While the book is very specific to point out that the different ogbanje fronting for Ada are not different personalities (so this is /not/ DID or as it used to be known Multiple Personality Disorder), there is also a portion of the novel that talks about a “fracturing” of Ada’s memories after trauma and how the fractures are kept separate to help her cope. This second description is similar to one of the newer theories of DID, but it is explored only a little bit in the book, so there is not quite as much to go on and is definitely separate from the ogbanje. Also, most other things that would be mental illnesses or mental health concerns for Ada are almost always caused by the ogbanje (mostly Asughara), so it’s an interesting intertwining because Ada’s experiences are caused by such a complex inner world but have standard outward symptoms of various problems. 
Overall, this is an extremely well-written and thought provoking book. I’m still thinking about it. I read/watched about six reveiws before writing mine, specially trying to find some own-voices reviews to fill in some of my knowledge gaps and get some other views on the story. I really enjoyed the review by Uche Ezeudu on YouTube as she gave a Nigerian perspective on the story. 
While it is definitely bleak at times, particularly in the middle of the story, the ending makes it closer to empowering. If you want a book will make you think and take you in with beautiful, sharp writing, you should read this wonderful debut novel from Emezi.

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aquamarine18's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional hopeful reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

<i>Freshwater</i> is a novel that I didn't read when it first came out mostly due to the content warnings, and they are warranted - this is a difficult read.  However, I'm so glad that I did read it -- it is incredibly well written, deeply affecting, innovative, and captivating -- magical realism at its absolute best.  Beyond being an incredible story, <i>Freshwater</i> is a reflection on identity, selfhood, and spirit that is unlike anything I've ever read before.  Incredible debut -- I very much look forward to reading Emezi's work.

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laurenleigh's review

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challenging dark emotional sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0

I was already amazed by Akwaeke Emezi after reading The Death of Vivek Oji, but I am now in complete awe after reading Freshwater. Emezi is a transcendent author. This semi-autobiographical novel was definitely dark and hard hitting (message me or check out my review on the StoryGraph for content warnings), but there is also so much life and light to be found here. This book gave me valuable insight into neurodivergence and gender exploration, while also teaching me about Igbo ontology. While western medicine would almost certainly diagnose this main character Ada with some kind of psychosis or bipolar disorder, there is an Igbo concept of “ogbanje,” a kind of malevolent spirit that lives inside certain children. Emezi envisions these spirits (who live inside Ada well past puberty) as inner Gods that have passed over from the other side, living inside their human form. Having these multiple selves certainly had a splintering effect on Ada, causing a lot of pain and struggle. But as they grow up, Ada also finds strength in these versions of themselves, learning and relearning their identity in all its multiplicity. As Ada begins to discover more about their Nigerian and Igbo ancestry, they can begin to see their inner demons in another light. I am SO glad the Queer Lit readathon picked this for the group read!

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tina94's review against another edition

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adventurous challenging dark emotional mysterious sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5


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nibs's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional informative medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.5

FInally got to reading this after reading the rest of Emezi's work. I had to order it in, but particularly with Dear Senthuran coming out this year, wanted to read it asap. The biggest thing going in is that this book is only fiction because white publishers would not accept it otherwise.

The most emotional, gut-wrenching and intimate part of this book is its reality. It is based in truth - how much crossover there is between Ada and the author is known, but is likely to be revealed in Dear Senthuran. I am eager for that book in how it will mirror this one. 

Spoiler Ultimately what I am most appreciative of is the conclusion. That there is understanding and peace and hope and a future; because in earlier parts of the book, similar to Asughara, I thought it could only end one way.

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marisaa's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional reflective medium-paced
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

This book was beautiful and aching. I will have to read it again someday, it feels like a book that hits you in different places at different times.

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emfass's review

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challenging dark emotional reflective sad slow-paced
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.25

It is hard to capture my feelings about this book - maybe I will come back and share more thoughts when I've processed a bit. 

I am close to someone who experiences dissociative identity disorder, and while I don't want to compare their experience to a culture/ontology/spirituality I know nothing about and the parallels and contrasts therein, I will also say that this book was both incredibly profound and challenging to read, due to how closely it seems to reflect some of my friend's experiences.

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