Reviews

Borders, by Thomas King

briana7's review against another edition

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challenging informative reflective fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? N/A
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0

sweet_dee_reads's review against another edition

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4.0

Not my favorite graphic novel, but I didn't hate it. I felt the storyline was not presented in the best way for the age group this is targeted to. Still a good read though.

yourstrulytay's review against another edition

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informative reflective fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? N/A

5.0

thenextgenlibrarian's review against another edition

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5.0

This graphic novel is beautifully drawn and written. It deals with Indigenous people and the issues they face with trying reclaim their culture, their land, their sense of self. It deals with border issues (those in Canada in this one) and how difficult it is to claim your country of origin when you're an Indigenous person. This book will be well-received by anyone who reads it because it hits so close to home on many issues we discuss in the US everyday.

radical_beatty's review

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hopeful reflective medium-paced

4.0

miss_alaina's review

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4.0

This was a good graphic novel that wasn't quite great, mainly because it felt like it was missing something. I think the addition of an author's note to give the story more context would've made a world of difference, especially considering the setting of the story. I have never crossed the border into Canada, so I have no idea what that process is like for me as an American citizen, let alone for someone who is Blackfoot. I felt distracted the entire time I was reading by stupid things - like, why didn't anyone ask the Mom for her ID at the border? Don't they need passports?? Couldn't they just look at her license plates and figure out she is coming from Canada? Honestly, I was too busy overthinking everything to truly appreciate the importance of the story.

elizabethlk's review against another edition

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4.0

Borders by Thomas King and Natasha Donovan is adapted from King's 1993 short story of the same name. I've enjoyed some of King's work in the past though and I'm a huge fan of Natasha Donovan and have read most of her published works, so I've been excited for this one even though I never read the short story it was adapted from.

This was a really interesting story. While I'm personally interested in border abolition, I'm also white so it wasn't a perspective I've spent much time learning about, but I think it's important to consider the ways borders impact traditional territories. I was also really interested in the way the events were seen through the eyes of a child who has a more innocent view of what's going on, and it was an interesting way to view the mother-daughter relationship.

Basically, this was a good story with an interesting point of view and Donovan's art is as gorgeous as ever, especially with the warm hues that fill the pages. Overall it's definitely worth reading!

emaretea's review against another edition

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informative reflective fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

claudiaslibrarycard's review against another edition

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challenging emotional medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

4.5

Borders is an excellent middle grades graphic novel with substance. It is the story of an indigenous mother and son going to visit the daughter who has moved away. They have an issue at the border crossing station and end up in limbo. You'll have to read it to discover the problem and how the mother and son view it differently. 

This is poignant and realistic, and I think it will prompt you to consider a different point of view and issues with border definitions and the idea of citizenship in our society. Full of heart and lovely illustrations, I highly recommend! 

miamollekin's review

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emotional funny hopeful medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0