thisisstephenbetts's review against another edition

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4.0

This really starts to hit its stride. It's shed its debt to Sandman from the first volume (which I was slightly surprised at). For the most part it's becoming less verbose too (although there are still fairly long passages of Morrisson's (pseudo?) automatic writing schtick). It's pretty scatter-shot, with different characters suddenly taking prominence, but there is a coherent arc.

Generally, there seems to be a certain attention to craft displayed here that Morrisson apparently decided was unnecessary at some point later in his career, and the whole thing - madcap, psychedelic, self-indulgent nonsense that it is - reads surprisingly well.

tsharris's review against another edition

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4.0

Still hard to decipher, still seductive.

tabone's review against another edition

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5.0

This series has quickly become one of my all-time favorites, despite the fact that I, in all seriousness, feel ill while reading it (sometimes).

a_monkey's review against another edition

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5.0

While “Arcadia” from “Say You Want A Revolution” is some of the most impressive and ambitious storytelling in this comic or anywhere else, every time I reread Fanny’s origin story in Apocalipstick it might be the most outright enjoyable as anything in the whole run.

matt4hire's review against another edition

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5.0

Probably one of my favorite volumes. I especially love the stories Royal Monsters (which is a great lampoon of '70s British upper-class spy flicks) and She-Man, which provides so much of the narrative meat for the remainder of the volume.

janedoelish's review against another edition

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5.0

As trippy as it gets, Apocalipstick ups the ante presented by the first volume.

jonmhansen's review against another edition

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4.0

The freakiness continues. I will say this: you'll either like this series or you'll hate it. I don't think there's a lot of middle ground here.

joshhansonhorror's review against another edition

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5.0

I read the first trade-paperback volume of Grant Morrison's the Invisibles last summer, and while it was certainly better than any other latter day Morrison I'd encountered, I wasn't blown away. It seemed to be just too much, too deliberately weird, too enamored of its own bad behavior. Adolescent.

Just finishing volume two, I'm hooked. This is what fictions are meant to do. The story-telling is the strongest I've seen from Morrison (and some of the strongest I've seen in comics), and brashness of the first volume, though not dissipating, seems well-earned.

Out of adolescence and into adulthood, the Invisibles shows that growing up doesn't mean settling down.

The catchword, the key to the kingdoms, the secret: disobedience.

Gimme more.

otherwyrld's review against another edition

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3.0

I'm still not wholly sold on this graphic novel series as parts of this were very good but other parts felt too disconnected from the rest of the story for it to run together. Best part was getting the back story of Lord Fanny, and it's certainly a weird one, especially when he/she goes on a vision quest to Mictlan, the Aztec land of the dead. It's told in a non linear fashion, which is appropriate because that's how Fanny experiences it. Other parts as I said, were less well developed.

The art was generally pretty good from a wide range of well known British artists.

tomcork's review

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challenging dark funny mysterious slow-paced

5.0