Reviews

Killing Time, by Caleb Carr

lyrrael's review against another edition

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3.0

written in a (u/dys)topian literary style, which includes a typical banging of the ideologue drum. surprisingly perceptive, given that it was published in 2000, is talking about many of the things we deal with today - misinformation and dissemination of the "official story", privacy, corporate influences in politics, genetic engineering, pollution & climate change, water scarcity, even unmanned/ drone warfare. reads surprisingly quickly. nowhere near as shallow as reviews would have you believe. far from perfect, yet worth the read. full review coming later. deeply flawed in the way most literary dystopias are in that the tour of the conceived world takes precedence over plot.

swflsweetie's review against another edition

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3.0

This is a very different work from what I've come to expect from Mr. Carr, but it was well written and certainly thought provoking.

wingedpotato's review against another edition

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3.0

So-so thriller about the dangers of info tech. Not the best I've read.

emikas's review against another edition

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3.0

I can’t believe this book was written before the iPhone! Carr’s thrilling narrative is hauntingly predictive of our modern fears.

pussreboots's review against another edition

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1.0

Caleb Carr is best known for his Victorian era mystery-thrillers. Killing Time is a departure from his usual fare as it's set in the near future and is more a social commentary than a mystery. It was serialized in Time Magazine before being released by Random House in book form. Somewhere in the mix of writing outside his normal genre and the challenge of writing a serial, the story fell apart.

Killing Time's premise is fascinating and earily realivant given the current economic crisis and our invasions of Afgahistan and Iraq. There's also the internet too playing a role, giving everyone too much information and none of it verifiable. Then there's the environment and the missing fish (among other problems). In other words, the world has gone to pot in 2023 and in that mess the protagonist is recruited to do some good.

Malcom Tressalian, his methods and his vessel, stink of Captain Nemo and the Natulus. As I slogged through the middle section of the book I found myself thinking more of Nemo as "eco-terroist" than I was about the book I was supposed to be reading. That's not a good sign!
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