Reviews tagging 'Bullying'

The Anthropocene Reviewed, by John Green

10 reviews

rensreading's review against another edition

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emotional funny hopeful inspiring lighthearted reflective relaxing medium-paced

5.0

this one is definitely going to be in my top 5 books this year for sure.

there’s just something about talking about things so mundane but have had such a profound impact on your life that really unsettles you, just for a moment. part of it being mundane usually means its insignificant enough to not warrant much attention, but then there are moment where they mark so MANY points in our lives. from teddy bears to sunsets to a hot dog eating contest, green’s life has been touched by so much and he still has so many more experiences to make.

i’m not generally a fan of his other stuff because of the way mass consumption turned his works into romanticism of various mental illnesses and yet this was raw. he held nothing back. he opened himself up and discussed how these little things really affected him during the lowest and highest points of his life. that’s exceedingly brave. and he absolutely should get his flowers for this book.

this felt like a diary and a hug wrapped into one. i loved it.

5 stars! (:

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readandfindout's review

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emotional hopeful informative reflective slow-paced

4.5

Style/writing: 4 stars
Themes: 4.5 stars
Perspective: 5 stars

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theonlybaillie's review

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emotional hopeful informative inspiring lighthearted reflective relaxing medium-paced

5.0


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caseythereader's review against another edition

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challenging emotional funny hopeful informative reflective sad fast-paced

5.0

 - Honestly, who gave John Green the right? Who let him make me experience the fullness of the human condition via audiobook?
- So many essays in this book had me thinking, oh this will be silly. Rating the Disney Hall of Presidents? This will be a laugh. Yes, but then he'll take a roundabout through a seemingly unrelated anecdote and suddenly you're crying while commuting to work.
- I do think a lot of the power of this book comes from the fact that Green wrote much of it during the early stages of the pandemic, and he frequently references that in the text. But it also adds more layers to the essays, helping to bring our current moment into the context of the whole of human history (whether or not that makes you feel better about the state of things...I'm not sure).
- I do recommend the audiobook for this, as Green puts so much emotion into his reading. Plus, you must hear the call of the extinct bird included in one of the essays. I hear the print version has additional notes, though, so I'll be checking that out as well. 

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astridrv's review

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emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring medium-paced
Thanks John I cried a bunch, underlined a fuckton of quotes, and feel strangely proud of John to have come all the way to this book. For anyone who needs a reminder that sustained, caring, and hopeful attention is the only thing that matters, really.

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tyyne's review against another edition

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emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

4.0

This waxed and waned but had many beautiful moments and interesting facts I’ll be thinking about for a while.

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scruffie's review against another edition

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challenging emotional funny hopeful informative lighthearted reflective sad medium-paced

5.0

I could hear John's voice in my head while reading this book. Simultaneously sad and anxious and hopeful, it felt very comforting to me; exactly what I needed right now. Medium-paced most of the time, but also slow-paced, on occasion.

Probably like others before me, I give the Anthropocene Reviewed five stars.

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toofondofbooks_'s review against another edition

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emotional inspiring reflective relaxing sad

5.0

the irony of leaving a 5 star scale review on a book that has so much commentary on the 5 star scale is not lost on me, and initially I didn't want to review it for that reason, but I loved it so much that I felt like I should tell you all that. My relationship with John Green as an author goes back almost 10 years. I've always loved his books, his Tumblr posts, and to borrow a line from TFIOS, I would read his grocery lists. Through his fiction he has always captured humanity through such a beautiful and sometimes ugly lense and so when I found out he was coming out with essays on the human condition, I was signed up immediately. It did exactly what I thought it would do. It brought me comfort, made me cry, made me laugh...specifically the chapters "Auld Lang Syne" and "Sycamore Tree" really got me. He reviews things that seem trivial like Dr. Pepper and then a chapter later he's talking about the meaning of life itself. I've really never read anything like this and at the same time I feel like I've read this before because the person who wrote it seems so familiar to me.

For its insight, it's softness in this rough time, and for keeping me company when I can't sleep at night, I give John Green's the anthropocene reviewed 5 stars.

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lou_o_donnell's review

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challenging emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring reflective relaxing fast-paced

5.0


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beccaruthe's review against another edition

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challenging emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring reflective sad medium-paced

5.0


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