Reviews tagging 'Antisemitism'

The Anthropocene Reviewed, by John Green

12 reviews

cemeterygay's review

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challenging dark emotional funny hopeful inspiring reflective sad

5.0

I did not expect for a John Green non-fiction book to become one of my favorite books but here we are.

I very casually read a couple of John Green's fiction books when I was younger but I grew out of that brand of YA pretty quickly. When I heard about The Anthropocene Reviewed I expected more of the same, but I was incredibly surprised.

If you need some joy and hope with a twinge of bittersweet sadness during this hell of a pandemic, I cannot recommend this book. This book helped me find beauty in the mundane but to cope with some of the most horrific parts of life in a way that didn't feel like either romanticization or denial. I especially adored the explorations of mental health and community throughout the entire book.

While I did like John Green's writing style previously, it never really stuck with me but I think the format and subject material of this book made it really stick with me. 

This book was an incredibly intense rollercoaster with high highs and low lows, that still managed to give me hope for the future and remind myself of the beauty that humanity can be.


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readandfindout's review

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emotional hopeful informative reflective slow-paced

4.5

Style/writing: 4 stars
Themes: 4.5 stars
Perspective: 5 stars

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hobbitslibrary's review

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emotional funny hopeful inspiring reflective medium-paced

5.0

You know when you have a late night chat with a friend, the topics of your conversation shifting from deep personal intimacies to inside jokes to silly stories and back again without judgement, and when it's all over, you feel like a layer of your shell just cracked a little bit, and like a part of you just healed a little bit, and like you just loved and were loved? That's how reading this book felt.

The Anthropocene Reviewed is an ode to humanity. It's simultaneously an examination and a love letter to life both collective and individual.

There are few books that have genuinely impacted my outlook on life, and it is no small thing to say that this is one of them. 

Thank you, John Green, for the tears, for the laughs, for the FASCINATING history of Monopoly, but most importantly for the hope. Because, in the end, that's really what this book is. A little beacon of hope.

I give the Anthropocene Reviewed 5 stars.

CW: immense discussion of death, pandemics, and mortality; discussion of anti-semitism and systemic oppression of marginalized communities; discussion of mental illnesses including OCD, anxiety, and depression.

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scruffie's review against another edition

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challenging emotional funny hopeful informative lighthearted reflective sad medium-paced

5.0

I could hear John's voice in my head while reading this book. Simultaneously sad and anxious and hopeful, it felt very comforting to me; exactly what I needed right now. Medium-paced most of the time, but also slow-paced, on occasion.

Probably like others before me, I give the Anthropocene Reviewed five stars.

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mathildem's review

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challenging emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring lighthearted reflective relaxing sad medium-paced

5.0


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kimi72714's review

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emotional hopeful reflective medium-paced

5.0

This book pulled me out of my reading slump in the way that only the writing of John Green can do. 

I knew many of the stories from Vlogbrothers videos, and so, even without the audiobook, John was reading aloud to me in my head. 

This book made me cry laugh with lines like "But you do so much yoga!", and real laugh with lines like "I've read more books on Hamlet than parenting". 

The pandemic is still going, and I'm still huddled inside my house to keep myself and my community safe, but this book reminded me how to fall in love with the world. 

The wind is whipping around my house as a big weather front moves through, which is very common this time of year. But I can hear the kids next door squealing in delight as they play in their backyard, and I'm grateful for a connection to the wider world. 

I give The Anthropocene Reviewed five stars. 

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ntvenessa's review

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emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring reflective relaxing medium-paced

5.0

A scrapbook of memories reflecting on the life of one, John Green, in the modern world, the Anthropocene. Indeed, it is phenomenon forward, and analyses our human relationship toward such phenomena. It shows that the distance between person and subject is not so distinct as we imagine, and that our experiences of a thing, contribute to the thing, as well as vice versa. It is about the density and quality of connection hewn in the modern world. The writing is deeply introspective and generous, and the themes broadly applicable to all. The essays capture the experiences of events spread across the spectrum of a life well lived, and indeed still living. Ultimately it is a beautiful, hopeful read, and personally my favourite Green novel. I rate The Anthropocene Reviewed five stars.

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spaceraspberry's review

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hopeful informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

4.5


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toofondofbooks_'s review against another edition

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emotional inspiring reflective relaxing sad

5.0

the irony of leaving a 5 star scale review on a book that has so much commentary on the 5 star scale is not lost on me, and initially I didn't want to review it for that reason, but I loved it so much that I felt like I should tell you all that. My relationship with John Green as an author goes back almost 10 years. I've always loved his books, his Tumblr posts, and to borrow a line from TFIOS, I would read his grocery lists. Through his fiction he has always captured humanity through such a beautiful and sometimes ugly lense and so when I found out he was coming out with essays on the human condition, I was signed up immediately. It did exactly what I thought it would do. It brought me comfort, made me cry, made me laugh...specifically the chapters "Auld Lang Syne" and "Sycamore Tree" really got me. He reviews things that seem trivial like Dr. Pepper and then a chapter later he's talking about the meaning of life itself. I've really never read anything like this and at the same time I feel like I've read this before because the person who wrote it seems so familiar to me.

For its insight, it's softness in this rough time, and for keeping me company when I can't sleep at night, I give John Green's the anthropocene reviewed 5 stars.

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elissareadsbooks's review

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emotional hopeful reflective slow-paced

5.0

i laughed. i cried. i felt like when you spend five hours having deep conversation with a good friend, come home happy and exhausted, and collapse on the couch to take a nap. this was so special and personal and my heart feels like it cracked open a bit.

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