Reviews

An Autobiography, by Angela Y. Davis

taniatrn's review

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informative inspiring tense medium-paced

4.0

radiantrox's review

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5.0

Gripping, profound, and still relevant today during times where racism and police brutality persist. Davis tells her story in a raw, articulate fashion that makes you feel like you're protesting, marching and even sitting beside her in those prison cells. I've been meaning to read this book for years and am finally glad I've finally completed it.

202claire's review

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emotional hopeful informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

4.0


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lawn's review

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ill get back to it! but it’s just long and a bit outdated. great storytelling though 

anahitareads's review

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5.0

I wasn't expecting to be unable to put this book down. I absolutely loved Angela Davis' narrative voice, the way she hooks you in, easy to comprehend but not simple or lacking nuance in any way, and the genius structure of the book, putting us in the present moment of the narrative before taking us back to her early adolescence and educational journey that led to her full-time activist work... each section containing a thought-provoking epigraph and metaphorical title that I found myself returning to after reading the section to really grasp its multiple meanings. Ultimately, one of my favorite written works. I learned so much. I will not stop thinking about it, for a long time.

bellaxrose's review

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4.0

FINALLY finished this one. So embarrassing that I forgot about it! Definitely a must read AND a re-read. I'm going to come back to this one so many times.

dalecooper's review

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adventurous challenging emotional informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

5.0

elreadsalot's review

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4.0

This book is incredibly well written - absurdly readable, which maybe is what happens when Toni Morrison is your editor(!). It follows the first twenty-something years of Angela Davis's life (she wrote it when she was 28), with a particular emphasis on her arrest, detainment and trial after she purchased some firearms for a friend of hers, the brother of one of the Soledad Brothers (three inmates who were convicted of killing a prison guard at Soledad Prison), who later held up a courtroom and was involved in a fatal altercation with the police. She was on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list and charged with first degree murder, a hefty charge that may have had something to do with the fact she was a member of the Communist Party and was involved with community organising around socialism, black liberation and feminism.

It covers her thoughts and feelings while she's imprisoned, the solidarity with other inmates and some of her political positions, her studies in philosophy, how she came to become a communist etc. I thought she maybe skipped over some less idealised parts of the communist countries she visits (East Germany, Cuba) - and I say this as someone who leans towards that politically myself. Overall, very compelling and I'd love to know what she thinks of it now, some 50 years on.

indielittttt's review

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5.0

5 stars doesn’t do this justice. This is invaluable, radical education, not only on the life of Angela Davis, but on the plight of all political prisoners. She never once individualized her situation, she is, was, and always will be for the complete liberation of all. Please read this.

bookwrapt's review against another edition

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I wanted to LOVE this, and I couldn't get into it after the first 30 pages or so. May have been time and place, definitely willing to revisit.