Reviews

Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot, by Mikki Kendall

eclucherini's review

Go to review page

challenging informative reflective fast-paced

5.0

katscove's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

A good read and I found it to be a nice review and introduction to intersectional feminism. For me, most of this book was a review (and if you have kept up with reading on intersectional feminism most of this book will probably be a review for you as well), but I found the last essay very useful. The difference between being and ally and being an accomplice is very interesting.

kashstephanie's review against another edition

Go to review page

informative slow-paced

5.0

kerrymur's review against another edition

Go to review page

informative reflective medium-paced

5.0

layla_platt's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

Really liked this book. It was so easy to listen to, Kendall has a great voice. Each chapter was extremely eyeopening to how so many topics, that you might not think about, effect so many women in different ways. How things that are part of everyday lives for women across the globe, need to be recognized feminist issues whether they effect you or not. I think I book marked the last sentence of every chapter because they were so poignant and thought provoking.

sarah_thebooknerd's review

Go to review page

challenging informative reflective medium-paced

5.0

This is such an important book and one that more white women in particular need to be reading to understand why we need to uproot white supremacy ideologies to be true feminists and accomplices.Β 

sarahelainewade's review against another edition

Go to review page

challenging informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

5.0

mcmorrdog's review against another edition

Go to review page

informative fast-paced

3.0

seeceeread's review against another edition

Go to review page

informative inspiring reflective
πŸ’­ "Freedom has a price that we all must pay together."

Kendall opens by telling us she's not nice, and she doesn't want to be β€” there's too much at stake. Feminism has left behind those who need it most. She uses the book's sections ro add details. By marginalized, she means poor, dark-skinned, Black, indigenous, Latine, trans and gender non-conforming, disabled, hood, rural, rez ... Mainstream US feminists should be taking up gun violence, hunger, sexuality, beauty and aesthetics, housing. Citing reports, Twitter trends, Serena Williams and federal government schemes, she explains why she's committed to shifting attention, as well as why she expects feminists to follow her.

MK has a solid thesis. She crams 𝘒 𝘭𝘰𝘡 (πŸ˜…) of good ideas into short essays and the text overall. Her anecdotes add welcome specificity. She's pushing for work I believe in, and do. But . . .

This did not slap. Maybe because I just read hooks' π—™π—²π—Ίπ—Άπ—»π—Άπ˜€π—Ί π—Άπ˜€ 𝗳𝗼𝗿 π—˜π˜ƒπ—²π—Ώπ˜†π—―π—Όπ—±π˜† and I'm stuck on how well bell did it. Or perhaps it's that Kendall's "we" of "mainstream feminism" felt like it was for somebody else, someone with more interest in hot takes on Alyssa Milano, Megan McCain and Lena Dunham. It might be that I don't especially identify with the approach. I abandoned the role of "ally educator" years ago; the pattern of white insistence on ignorance that must be appealed to and appeased is exhausting and as Toni told me, "None of this is necessary. There will always be one more thing."

I hope the right people find this book. And learn better. And do better. And I rebuke a starring role in their growth process πŸ€·πŸ½β€β™€οΈ

softboycafe's review

Go to review page

challenging emotional informative medium-paced

3.5