samkraft's review against another edition

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3.0

I really enjoyed this book. It focused in on Jameis Winston, who played football at FSU as a quarterback. A young female came forward saying how Winston rape and sexually assaulted her at a party and they have found clear evidence that he did. YET, obviously they didn't do anything about it/ got a way with it because currently, he PLAYS in the NFL as a quarterback. It is very frustrating reading this and seeing where he is now. The last part of the book talks about ways the NCAA, teams, coaches, and men in general, can stop rape from happening. Definitely recommend.

theseventhl's review against another edition

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5.0

Content warning: this review discusses a book which covers the topic of rape and rape culture in a collegiate setting and could be potentially triggering to some readers. This article will avoid any explicit descriptions of events and acts in the text, but the book itself does not have the same discretion for details.

A young woman is assaulted by a football player at a campus party. She goes to the police. She goes to the administration. She goes to the coaches. The police stall, the administration wring their hands, and the coaches suggest that the woman forget the entire event happened. After all, that football player is a rising star on the team. He is an NFL prospect in the making. Does she not see how her accusation will ruin lives? She is threatened by the player’s friends. She withdraws from classes, loses her scholarship, and transfers to another school. The assailant wins.

This is not uncommon in 2016; a woman goes up against a college-level athlete with an accusation of rape and is torn down in the process. The details are not always exactly the same every time, but they should be. This is the focal point of Jessica Luther’s new investigative book, which drags college sports down from the pedestal on which society has put it, and reveals all of the cracks and flaws that threaten its legacy and, most importantly, put the lives of women in danger every year.

You can read my full review of UNSPORTSMANLIKE CONDUCT at the Current independent student newspaper website. A reviewer copy of the paperback was provided for free by Akashic Books/Edge of Sports; no other compensation was offered for this review, nor was a review required to receive the book.

hedytf's review against another edition

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5.0

This was a really good book. I liked how it addressed possible solutions to the problem, and also discussed systemic issues within the NCAA.

klndonnelly's review against another edition

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5.0

Necessary and thorough work on an important topic.

kikiandarrowsfishshelf's review against another edition

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4.0

Luther looks at college rape in terms of football players being charged. She addresses all aspects of the issue - including the issue of race as well as how the media reports on such things. Engrossing, easy read.

combledore's review against another edition

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3.0

Good and definitely important, but not what I was expecting. This is sort of like a collected series of articles - like a big New York Times series on some societal problem that's been collected into a book. Not bad at all, but I was expecting something more investigative, maybe with interviews, more like the author's amazing story for Texas Monthly that's mentioned in this book. Instead, it's a long survey of the problem and a shorter section of recommendations. There's clearly a ton of research that's been done here, and Luther clearly knows the topic well, but it doesn't seem like a lot of interviews were done with people actually involved in college football. I wish there had been more of that, just to get the perspective on the ground along with the great content in here. I'd still definitely recommend this book - while it wasn't what I thought it would be, it's still crucial information that we all should be aware of.

(Read Harder 2017: #1 Read a book about sports.)

krafsa01's review against another edition

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3.0

I really enjoyed this book. It focused in on Jameis Winston, who played football at FSU as a quarterback. A young female came forward saying how Winston rape and sexually assaulted her at a party and they have found clear evidence that he did. YET, obviously they didn't do anything about it/ got a way with it because currently, he PLAYS in the NFL as a quarterback. It is very frustrating reading this and seeing where he is now. The last part of the book talks about ways the NCAA, teams, coaches, and men in general, can stop rape from happening. Definitely recommend.

laurbear's review against another edition

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4.0

This wasn't a perfect book, but I think it's an important read for sports fans. It's definitely tough to get through at times, but I think Luther did a good job of balancing everything. My one major complaint was that some sections were a lot more detailed and felt better thought out than others. In some ways it seemed like Luther was trying to write a book that would appeal to too many different audiences, which is tricky with such an emotional subject. I did think Luther did a good job of presenting facts and stories without too much bias and any media that sheds more light on the problem of toxic masculinity and rape culture in sports is important.

Received from Edelweiss in exchange for review.

alisonrose711's review

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5.0

This book is so very important, and I'm really glad it was Jessica Luther who wrote it. Her research is thorough and meticulous, she carefully applies an intersectional lens, and she speaks from the point of view of both a sports fan and a compassionate social justice activist who never wants us to forget to center the victims in sexual assault cases. She shows wisdom and empathy on all points, and offers some very smart and very feasible changes that colleges, sports organizations, and the media can and should adopt in order to try to lessen and hopefully eradicate sexual violence in this arena.

kbc's review

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4.0

I'm die-hard Packers fan, but the stories of violence against women in both the NFL and college football are making it harder for me to justify giving my money and attention to football and the NCAA. Luckily, Luther is a fan herself and knows the struggle.

This book does a great job at widening the story from just looking at the accused. She looks at the structures - universities, the NCAA, the media and American culture - that allow rape culture to flourish in football programs. She also provides a few concrete solutions to combat these forces.

If you were disappointed in Missoula not dealing with the larger issues dealing with football and rape, this is a good book to read.