Reviews tagging Genocide

The House in the Cerulean Sea, by TJ Klune

5 reviews

thegoldenageofgabylon's review against another edition

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emotional funny hopeful medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0


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rai's review against another edition

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adventurous emotional reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.5


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starbyproxy's review against another edition

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adventurous funny hopeful lighthearted medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

The feeling of reading this book is akin to watching my favourite childhood movie, truly a heartwarming experience that leaves me in a puddle of happy tears. 

TJ Klune has created something special here and I hope everyone has the pleasure of enjoying this little slice of home. His dialogue has to be the best part of his writing, equal parts witty and endearing. Lucy is probably my favourite character in the book, quite possibly my favourite fictional six-year-old. 

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alycea's review against another edition

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I learned that this book was “inspired” by the Sixties Scoop, and I have no interest in continuing to read a book that glamorizes residential schools and the genocide of Indigenous people.

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natverse's review against another edition

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adventurous emotional funny hopeful inspiring lighthearted medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

2.75

Here's the thing about this book, it is well-written. The author has a great style and the characters and children you meet are so freaking loveable, you cannot hate this book. But here's the other thing about this book, it repackages white saviourism. A non-magical white, queer man is our hero, meant to save the day for all the magical children.

Additionally, I know TJ Klune claims that his inspo came from real effects of the genocide of Indigenous people that are still being felt by their communities to this day, but it absolutely reads like someone who has very little understanding of what being marginalized is like. I can absolutely appreciate his message in "kindness", but it's extremely naive and misguided.

Residental schools are not a feel-good fantasy story. The Sixties Scoop isn't a fun scenario to rethink. If a random author revealed to me that they decided to write a fictionalized version of my grandfather's murder  but make it *fun* and heartwarming, I'd be pissed. Now add in hundreds of years of systemic oppression. Colonizers have always told their version of the story. So for another white guy to write his version of the story, once again, it's like...why?

I should add I didn't know about the residential school connection until someone mentioned it to me halfway through me reading this book, at which point the tone and context really changed for me. It also added an element of predictability with Linus. 

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