Reviews

This Impossible Light, by Lily Myers

eveliina1's review against another edition

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2.0

Just not my style. Wasn't that the book was bad just didn't find it interesting myself

mj_reads's review against another edition

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2.0

This Impossible Light is a beautiful story about struggling with your image. A girl is trying very hard to live up to the picture perfect image that she has created for herself, and as a result falls down a very dark path with her physical health. She develops an eating disorder. The portrayal of the MCs ED is the only saving grace of this book. The rest of the story fell really flat for me.

This story does hit a lot on the head when describing the internal battle that someone who has an eating disorder may experience, there were a few spots that I really felt connected too. But unfortunately other than that, the story was lacking a lot. It was beautifully written, but ultimately it was pretty unremarkable. Nothing about this story is memorable. If I didn’t connect to it, I probably would have DNFed it because it was generic and boring.

My biggest issue with this book was how simple it made everything surrounding eating disorders seem. It made it appear so easy to hide, so easy to start, so easy to decide when enough is enough. But honestly it is a lot more complicated than that. I’m honestly so surprised at how the author nails the portrayal of ED on the head and then misses so much at the end, it could be to leave this as an optimistic ending for others who suffer in ways similar to the MC, but it just made the entire process feel to clean and simple for me.

This book was okay, it was just missing something for me.

hoffnungswolke's review against another edition

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5.0

First things first: I received this book through NetGalley.

Trigger warning: eating disorder.


Summary: Fifteen-year-old Ivy's world is in flux. Her dad has moved out, her mother is withdrawn, her brother is off at college, and her best friend, Anna, has grown distant. Worst of all, Ivy's body won’t stop expanding. She's getting taller and curvier, with no end in sight. Even her beloved math class offers no clear solution to the imbalanced equation that has become Ivy’s life.

Everything feels off-kilter until a skipped meal leads to a boost in confidence and reminds Ivy that her life is her own. If Ivy can just limit what she eats—the way her mother seems to—she can stop herself from growing, focus on the upcoming math competition, and reclaim control of her life. But when her disordered eating leads to missed opportunities and a devastating health scare, Ivy realizes that she must weigh her mother's issues against her own, and discover what it means to be a part of—and apart from—her family.


This book. THIS BOOK!!!
This book totally caught me off guard. Once again it's one of those books that I got from Netgalley, forgot about it and then started reading it without reading the summary again and didn't know what to expect.


The book deals with some tough topics but I think, they are handled really sensitive and respectful. The writing was so damn beautiful. Seriously, some of these moments in Ivy's life were so painful but they were written in the most beautiful way.


Poetry is my new favorite thing but I only ever read books with lots of different poetry, this time it was a whole book, a whole story. And it was beautiful.
It was super easy to get into, I started the book and pretty soon was half way through it. The characters were wonderful and so fleshed out.


Aaaah, I just love this book so much, it made me feel all the things and I highly recommend it.

amyjoneswrites's review against another edition

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5.0

incredible
beautiful
heartbreaking

goldenbeebookshop's review against another edition

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4.0

I'm a big fan of "Shrinking Women" and was excited when I learned earlier this year that Myers would have a book coming out.
I finally got the chance to read that book today and was once again stunned by the beauty of her careful, precise prose.
Ivy's story is a familiar one, with divorce and the changing dynamics of friendships adding new complications to the habits/issues we learn from our parents.

I appreciate the Myers and her publishers included resources for those who may be experiencing eating disorders and disordered eating behavior. I hope that anyone who reads this and finds Ivy's experience to feel close to home that you're able to focus on the tools she's able to use by the end of the story in order to once again be able to find peace in your body and to know that you are already enough.

regina_confettibookshelf's review against another edition

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4.0

If you've not seen the YouTube video of Lily Myers performing her slam poem "Shrinking Woman," stop what you're doing and watch it right now. I added her first novel in verse to my TBR pile as soon as I heard she had a book coming out. While it didn't provoke the same strong reaction I have to "Shrinking Woman," there are enough glimmers of genius to keep me a fan. I'd love to read a non-verse novel by her. Fingers crossed she'll have the opportunity to write one!

sarahspillerr's review against another edition

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4.0

This book is beautiful, sad, real, and haunting. As someone that has experienced some of what she has gone through, I know it is all too real at some points. Writing the entire story in poetry makes it even more poignant.

If you have or are recovering from an ED, please use caution before deciding to read this because it can be very triggering.

bookmerized's review against another edition

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3.0

I definitely enjoyed this. I think the behaviors are spot on for people with anorexia/bulimia. However, I thought the turn around to "I realize what I'm doing is wrong and I'll stop" was SUPER quick (like two therapy sessions quick), and I just don't buy into that.

theuntitleddocument's review against another edition

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4.0

Fans of Sarah Crossan are sure to like this.

utopiastateofmind's review against another edition

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5.0

This Impossible Light is a beautiful wok of art. Combining poetry and narrative, the culmination is not only touching, but incredibly relateable. If you enjoyed, "Shrinking Women" this is a must. It takes the story of a young girl suffering from an eating disorder, and complicates it. By making it about her: her relationship with grief, her mother, and her friends, this book reads quickly, but will move you. I loved every aspect, from the mathematical concepts, to the thematic touches, to the word choices. It deals with issues of fractured families, changing bodies, and moving on. While it can be impossible for us to find the light at some moments or another, it is always there. I cannot get over how in love I am with this story and am already looking forward to reading it again.

Disclaimer: I received this book in exchange for an honest review from Netgalley
full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/review-impossible-light-lily-myers/