Reviews for Tweet Cute, by Emma Lord

batmads's review against another edition

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5.0

Very cute! You've Got Mail but YA, and with TWITTER. *heart eyes all the way*

mahreen18's review

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emotional funny inspiring lighthearted relaxing medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? It's complicated
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.25

celestemarin's review against another edition

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3.0

In the real life enemies anonymously communicating online realize they misunderstood the other person and fall in love trope, I guess this is better than many. The desserts mostly sounded pretty vile though. I mean, fine for teenage boy who missed breakfast, but for hip New Yorkers?

joeyhalbert's review against another edition

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5.0

You've Got Mail 3000

This YA novel has EVERYTHING: tweeting twins, grilled cheese sandwiches, Nashville girls baking feminist desserts, dive teams, teens crying, and celebrity endorsements.

Tweet Cute by Emma Lord centers around Pepper and Jack, two high school seniors attending a swanky private school in Manhattan. While they live in a Gossip Girl-like world of swanky luxury, things don’t feel luxurious to the main characters. Pepper is a Nashville transplant, unsure of her place in NYC and in her own family. Her parents are recently divorced. Her father stayed in Nashville, her older sister Paige went to school at Penn, and so Pepper is alone with her mega business mom. (The family owns a mom-and-pop burger shop that quickly turned into a top fast-food restaurant in America.) Jack grew up in Manhattan, but still feels like an outsider at school. His twin brother is the popular, successful one. That leaves him as the class clown and family black sheep. Instead of spending his time around Manhattan, Jack mostly sits in his room programming or downstairs helping out in the family deli. His programming hobby led him to create Weasl, an anonymous chat app used by students at his school to build deeper relationships and mess around generally. While Pepper and Jack barely know one another at school, they find themselves facing off in an online battle of wits as Pepper’s family chain seems to have ripped off a grilled cheese recipe from Jack’s family deli.

The name of the book and the cover basically lead the reader to know what exactly to expect. I haven’t revealed anything not already apparent. What sets this book apart from a lot of book is the humanity of all of the characters. Pepper navigates a lot of complex feelings and emotions about her parents and their divorce, her relationship with her sister, family businesses going large. Jack is trying to figure out how to find his place in the world – to find the courage to be while also keeping his family happy. Emma Lord writes like someone that’s been on the internet and understands the culture (and some subcultures). The ambivalence that the young characters feel about social media in particular was especially interesting to me.

It’s a fun book. Humane without being sentimental, honest without digging up too much, cute without being saccharine. Despite the PG nature of the book, the language moves it up to an R, just FYI. Maybe don’t blast it at work if you get the audiobook. By the way, Emily Shaffer and Dan Bittner do a great job in the audiobook.

clara_herondale's review against another edition

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4.0

È un sacco tenero e carino, mi ha tenuto incollata alla storia e mi ha fatto fangirlare un sacco però... non posso proprio considerarlo un retelling YA di Romeo e Giulietta: l'atmosfera e le situazioni non richiamano proprio quelle della tragedia shakespeariana. È "solo" un bel
contemporary romance (che non è affatto una cosa negativa, semplicemente mi ero approcciata al libro credendolo un retelling di Romeo e Giulietta e su questo aspetto mi ha delusa molto)

lorireads's review

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funny lighthearted fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.0

thenarratress's review against another edition

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4.0

This was so cute! I really enjoyed reading this. Will write a full review later.

My rating according to CAWPILE is 4 stars

jasminemilktea's review

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adventurous emotional funny hopeful relaxing fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

greenlivingaudioworm's review against another edition

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4.0

“It’s weird, when you have no idea how far you’ve come, until suddenly, you can’t find the way back.”

This book was so stinking cute. I'm not sure if I liked Pepper or Jack's story arc better, but I really liked both teens and getting a glimpse into their lives dealing with life in the restaurant business. It was refreshing to read a story from the perspective of the "smart girl" without her being totally brainy and unapproachable. I could relate to Pepper's desire to throw yourself into something just to avoid facing bigger issues and I feel like this is something many teenagers can relate to.

Do parents really move to a new town with their teenage daughter and then jet off to work long hours to climb the business ladder? This seems to be something I see popping up more and more in recent teenage stories. As difficult as it was for me at times, I cannot imagine being a teenager and going home to an empty house. Pepper was remarkably well-adjusted for being thrust into this situation. I appreciated that she threw herself into baking, which is both a delicious and effective way to structure her time to stay out of trouble.

Jack was so refreshing as a character as well. I really enjoyed his relationship with his grandmother and getting to know his inner passion of app development. Again, it was nice to be in the mind of a character who does something productive of his time but also is relatable. I feel like too many characters are poorly developed as the geeky sidekick who happens to create apps, but Jack didn't feel this way at all.

I do worry how this book will age over time. In 20 years will readers understand Twitter and the references to Mean Girls? Maybe that is part of the territory in contemporary literature: making the story so relevant to readers right now that it doesn't age well. I hope readers will continue to pick up this book and enjoy the story of Pepper and Jack because it was very well done.

letterstojuly's review

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adventurous emotional hopeful lighthearted fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0