Reviews

Shattered Midnight, by Dhonielle Clayton

wienerschnitzel315's review

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4.0

Cute story with 1920s setting that I definitely appreciated. Who wouldn’t love a fast paced fantasy set in New Orleans with all its Jazz scene

bookedblckgirl's review

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adventurous dark emotional fast-paced

5.0

jenayross's review

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dark emotional hopeful mysterious sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.5

mbladams's review

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4.0

I enjoyed reading Shattered Midnight, and now need to go back and find book 1 in this series!

Zora has magic in her family. Her mother's magic comes out through her cooking, and Zora's comes out through music notes. Something tragic happens in New York, when her anger at a client's treatment of her mother caused her to lose control. She is sent to live with her aunt and cousins in New Orleans. Her aunt vows to end this magic nonsense, and make Zora into the most eligible debutante of 1929.

Zora has other plans. She meets another singer/musician, Jo, and they perform at a jazz club regularly, sneaking out of the house to do so. One night, she meets Phillip, a white man who shares her love of jazz music and performing. He plays with her and Jo, and, despite the overwhelming odds against them, Zora and Phillip fall in love. But her aunt still continues in her plans for Zora to make her debut along with her cousins, and for Zora to marry eligible bachelor Christophe.

Zora and Phillip have another bond other than music - magic. Zora has magic shoes that allow her to walk noiselessly, and Phillip has a mirror that shows the future (or a potential future). Both of their families have roots in Germany, and their shared heritage involves magic. They have to decide if it is worth keeping these artifacts and their magic, or if it is better to sell or give them away, and have a chance for a "normal" life.

I really love how Clayton writes books that address racism, class and privilege, but integrate those topics into thoroughly entertaining stories with fantasy, magic and supernatural elements. Teenagers (and adults) will appreciate how authentic her characters and the world she has created for them feel.

Even though this is the second book in the series, it reads well as a stand-alone. I look forward to tracking down book 1, and look forward to reading book 3 in the future! Thanks to Netgalley for this advanced copy of a wonderful book.

minni92's review

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4.0

4⭐ - I liked it a lot!

I liked book 1 more, but I'm happy to say, I really liked this too! Liked the 20s vibes, and the connections between the books and the magic

ravenclawomanistcyborgwitch's review against another edition

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4.0

I loved this story, but especially the narration. The voice actor was EXCELLENT. This story was literally #BlackGirlMagic. Great character development and Zora was a joy to read about. Romance was nice. Dhionielle Clayton is a wonderful author and I will be reading more of her books and also the Mirror Series overall. Thanks so much Netgalley for the audiobook!

canderson's review

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4.0

*I received a free ebook copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.*

I went out and purchased Broken Wish, because I definitely overlooked this as a series when I first chose to read it. First off, I’m glad I read Broken Wish first — it isn’t totally required, but it does help with the underlying storyline if you choose to continue reading the other books. Shattered Midnight, and even Broken Wish, were quick reads. They were well-paced, easy to read, and while predictable as retellings often are, I never felt as if the story suffered for that predictability.

Shattered Midnight was definitely my favorite of the two. There was so much richness to this novel; I felt like I was smack-dab in the middle of New Orleans. Where Broken Wish felt more whimsy and light, this felt heavy and dangerous. The descriptions were vivid and the story line had me hooked from the first few pages.

This retelling felt very Cinderella to me; Zora is sent to live with her aunt and two cousins after her magic causes deadly destruction at home in New York. Under the guise of a stage name, Zora performs at a Jazz club late at night, sneaking away from her aunt to touch the music she has been banned from accessing: her music is connected to her magic.

This Grimm Fairytale style-retelling wasn’t just a simple retelling though. Instead, this novel centered around culture and social norms of New Orleans in the 20s. Zora is colored and dangerous falls in love with a rich white boy. This struggle between not only class, but race, has readers on the edges of their seats from the first few chapters until the last.

debs_shelves's review

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4.0

This was a super quick read. The story was fast past and definitely held my interest.

Zora is running away from something horrible that she did, and it's a while before we know exactly what. She's living with her aunt and cousins in New Orleans. Her aunt desperately wants to marry her off.

I liked Zora and her interactions with her suitor, with Jo and with Phillip.

It ended rather abruptly and I feel like the story was not quite complete. I do love this author's writing style and still enjoyed the book.

Thank you to NetGalley and Disney Publishing for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

katalynbc13's review

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emotional hopeful reflective sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.5

taraminter's review

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dark mysterious reflective tense medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.0