Reviews

Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott

whatkathrynreads_'s review against another edition

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emotional hopeful inspiring lighthearted reflective sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

kerryanndunn's review against another edition

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4.0

This was my first re-read of this as an adult and I mean, what can I say? It's a classic. I will say this: I much prefer the first half of the book when the girls are young, to the second half of the book when they are older. And there are some chapters that are just interminable. Like the one where Jo goes "calling" on neighbors with Amy. Ugh. And Meg's struggle to be the perfect wife to John. But there is always the great wisdom of Marmee and the love between all the sisters. Alcott was ahead of her time. She believed strongly in women empowerment before that was a thing. And it comes out in this story. And distilled down to its essence for film, this story is fantastic. Every year at Christmas I watch the 1994 Winona Ryder as Jo version and I love it. It's a tradition.

gretchlins's review against another edition

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3.0

The only reason I didn't stop reading this book was because it was a required read for school. Part 1was horrible, to slow. Part two it got better but still wasn't great.

sallyb72's review against another edition

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5.0

Charming story of family life beginning at the time of the Civil War and continuing for15 years. Sisterly love. Motherly advice. Dreams that change over time.

heathernj9's review against another edition

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5.0

My favorite book from childhood. I still love the story and have reread it many times. I always thought it would be neat to be a part of that family.

duskyliterati's review against another edition

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4.0

One of my favorite books from my childhood, this was a re-read for me. While I have a couple printed versions of the book, I downloaded the version I read from Project Gutenburg onto my Kindle. For some reason, I didn’t remember how a long a read this was, so it took me a few days to finish. While I had read other books in the series (i.e., Little Men and Jo’s Boys), it was only while reading this version that I realized the second part of this book was called Good Wives.

The story opens in the March’s New England home at Christmas and the reader is introduced to the four March sisters: Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy. The time period is the Civil War and the sister’s Father is away fighting, so their mother, Marmee is head of the household. Alcott gives the four sisters very distinctive personalities. While the March family experiences poverty and other hardships, we see them grow into sensible, mature women through the firm and practical teachings of their Marmee. That’s one of the things I really love about this book, is that Marmee allows her children to experience failure and defeat as a way to impart principles.

Of course, my favorite sister has always been the tomboyish and bookish Jo. She was my first childhood heroine. I loved how she was unconventional but yet found love on her own terms at the end of the novel. I enjoyed it as much now as I did during my teen years.

rita_sofia's review against another edition

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emotional slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.0

holly_mcarthur's review against another edition

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adventurous emotional funny sad medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0

angeliee's review

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adventurous emotional hopeful inspiring slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

sarahrara's review against another edition

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4.0

Firstly, let me say that I'm not religious, and yes the constant preaching did get on my nerves. A little more subtlety would not have hurt, but I guess you need to remember the time it was written in.

I knew very little about this book going in (mostly just what's referenced in that episode of Friends where Joey wants to put the book in the freezer), and was kind of expecting the American Jane Austen. This is quite far from it.

It's very preachy and very sentimental, BUT, I did still give it 4 stars. Because despite this, I found the writing good and the characters very engaging. I was hooked and wanted to know how they all turned out. I started crying on the train several times while reading this. It's definitely not always a smooth ride for these little women, but I really enjoyed following their lives.

If you can get past the whole morality story for kids bit, there's a genuinely good and interesting story full of loveable characters here.