Reviews

The Rabbit Back Literature Society, by Pasi Ilmari Jääskeläinen

kheleyr's review against another edition

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adventurous challenging dark emotional mysterious reflective slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? No
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

emmafoxtail's review

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4.0

4.5/5

kyleofbooks's review

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3.0

I was extremely enthused to read this when a friend recommended it ("If you loved 'The Secret History', then you'll really love this..."), although, in the end, I found it mildly quirky and charming, with a couple of mysteries thrown in, but altogether missing something I just can't quite articulate.

The magical realism was done well (and I admit to being a sucker for it), the writing translated spectacularly from its native language, and I found one of the resolved 'little mystery' at the end sweet and pleasantly surprising, but I have a bit of a gripe with the lack of answers as to the main mystery.

Maybe I'm missing something, or didn't fully comprehend the symbolism in the text, but there was absolutely no resolution to it. Now, don't get me wrong, I'm all for ambiguity and literature not giving away all the answers, but this one was major for me. I invested so much time in soaking up every morsel, every minutiae detail, only to be left standing in the proverbial cold at the end with not even a hint as to what the answer was.

All in all, an OK read; Not good, not great...just OK.

piku_baumann's review

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4.0

I'm much more into 'depressing reality' than 'magical realism'. This book entwined the two and I'm not sure how to feel about it. I wouldn't insist anyone has to read it. But there were very enjoyable moments in here. Oh, and I guess it helps if you have a general understanding of the Finn. Which is a phenomenon hard to describe.

"When she'd returned to Rabbit Back, Ella had consisted of lovely curving lips, faulty ovaries, and a future as a language and literature teacher."
"Falling in love with a person's momentary being was as irrational as falling in love with the left side of his face, or the back of his head, or some other individual part of him."
"She had ridden her bike to the school one Monday morning and before she knew it the breeze had wiped away thirteen years of her life."

treereader's review

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4.0

Very odd. But very good.
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