Reviews for The Upside of Unrequited, by Becky Albertalli

alicia's review against another edition

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4.0

My only complaints is that some of the dialogue felt very unrealistic (the adults sometimes sounded very juvenile) and the author overuse of the word "problematic" (which never, ever fails to make me cringe). I'm also not a fan of pop culture references within a book, it's all going to feel very dated in 4-5 years.

celestemarin's review against another edition

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3.0

This book opens with a scene of high school kids at a show at the 9:30 Club, having to leave early to run to catch the last Metro home, which is one of my enduring memories of my teenage years, so I was positively disposed toward the book. The characters were less engaging and funny than "Simon and the Homo-Sapiens Agenda", and there was less in the way of plot, but it had a lot of the same elements of growing up and having new relationships can change relationships with family and friends, and lots of diversity (mostly positive, with occasional challenges) in terms of sexuality, race and religion without being heavy-handed.

bookiesncookies's review against another edition

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5.0

I stayed up late to finish reading this book so ya know it was good. I read it in 1 (and a half) sittings. It lived up to my hopes of authentic voice and tone and story (except the teens wake up early most days like, that's the ONLY questionable part). There is so much good representation of cultures, identities, orientations, family types, body types. I am amazed and in awe of how wonderfully crafted this book is.

While I do have the sense that Albertalli's novels fit best with today's readers with not as much potential for longevity due to the numerous (and fabulous) pop culture references, I believe her books are worth reading today and SHOULD be read today.

I'd love to list the moments that resonated with me, but it would be long and cumbersome and better suited for a discussion than a review. Just know that the main character Molly and I had more in common than I anticipated and it was validating.

madapult's review against another edition

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5.0

Every feeling Molly feels in this, I feel. It is just that good!

aimey's review against another edition

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2.0

I’m not trying to overthink things. I’m trying to be less careful. But you have to be your heart’s own goalie.

I picked this book up to avoid the reading slump that I could see just looming over the horizon. Sometimes getting back to our favorite characters is all it takes to elude it.
I read the other two Simonverse books earlier this year. And though this one doesn't directly follow those characters, just knowing that these were somehow related to them was enough excuse for me. And it worked just fine...
I have heard a lot of good things about this book, but unfortunately, it fell flat for me.
It's just a story about a girl who (just like in most other contemporaries) thinks she is not beautiful and is obsessed with the idea of getting a boyfriend and getting kissed and having sex, because everyone else around her has already experienced all of this. This book is entirely devoted to searching for a boyfriend for our main character, Molly. Nothing really happens throughout book. It was a very plain read.
One thing I would like to appreciate is how diverse this book is in terms of sexuality, color, body type and religion. And none of it felt forced.
And I did enjoy the parts where the characters from Simon vs. The Homosapiens Agenda make an appearance. There were also some parts where it kinda felt a bit relatable.
But the romance (especially towards the end) was cheesy and way too cringey.
I didn't hate this book, but there really wasn't anything special about it.

mayakittenreads's review against another edition

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4.0

If it would let me I would actually rate this 4 & 1/2 stars.

thenarratress's review against another edition

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3.0

Review follows soon

greenlivingaudioworm's review against another edition

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5.0

"But you know, there's an upside here. Because when you spend so much time just intensely wanting something, and then you actually get the thing, it's magic."

This book. Seriously, all the feels. Becky Albertalli perfectly captured that high school feeling of feeling left behind. I distinctly remember feeling like Molly when all of my friends started dating and then talking about dating type things and I had no clue what they were talking about. It can be such a lonely feeling. While this story plops us into Molly's life in a story arc that can be tied up in a nice little bow, it was still a fun story to follow. I found myself literally laughing out loud throughout the story because Becky just has a way with words.

And can we talk about how awesome Reid is? A Tolkien loving nerdy boy everyone else seems to look past? Those boys are the best. I could talk Middle-Earth for hours with Reid. I'm kind of jealous of his Lord of the Rings themed shirts. Send them all to me, please.

Ok, I'm done. Read this book. It's absolute YA gold.

itsabooksworld's review against another edition

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5.0

This book is so relatable to so many of us, so go read it if you haven't already! Only wished it came out when I was a teenager, but oh well.

eva_dx's review against another edition

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4.0

Becky Albertalli is one of my favourite authors ever. All her books are amazing! This one too. Her writing style is quick, light and funny. I love it.

First of all I want to talk about the diversity in this novel. Molly's twin sister Cassie is lesbian, her girlfriend Mina is pansexual and Korean American, one of Molly's moms is lesbian and black, the other bisexual and white, Molly's family and Reid's family are Jewish, etc. This book is full of diversity and I love that.

Molly has anxiety and it's handeled very well. Molly takes her daily medicine. It's said she shouldn't be drinking because of the medicine. She tells briefly about her panic attacks. It's really not a big deal in the story. It's just there and it's aknowledged.

I loved the family dynamics in this book. It just felt right.

This book was also so relatable in terms of swearing and the internet. Albertalli hit the mark. It was just the right, realistic amount.

Let me just tell you how much I love Reid, seriously he's the absolute best. He's so sweet and adorable. He's funny and geeky. Actually he's exactly the kind of guy I would fall for in real life.

Molly does have a lot of insecurities. It was very relatable. A bit too relatable, I guess. I started thinking about myself and critisizing myself in a way that isn't healthy. I was actually really unhappy. That's also the reason I'm not giving this book five stars. It just doesn't feel right to do so.