Reviews for One Last Stop, by Casey McQuiston

oreo's review

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adventurous emotional funny hopeful inspiring lighthearted mysterious reflective relaxing fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

justinjfrancis's review

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hopeful fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

5.0

bloodredrache's review against another edition

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5.0

A delightful new romance from Casey McQuiston, ONE LAST STOP was an absolute pleasure from beginning to end. I loved Subway Girl and Coffee Girl so much, and there's nothing more satisfying than a book that loves its characters as much as you do.

becsobookish's review

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adventurous emotional hopeful reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.25

paragraphsandpages's review

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5.0

First off, I'd like to thank Netgalley, the author, and the publisher for allowing me the chance to read and review an advanced copy of this book. All opinions are my own, and are based on an early version of the book that can differ from the final, released version.

If you're just expecting RWRB V.2 but f/f, you'd better alter your expectations. One Last Stop is fantastic in its own ways, but its strengths vary drastically from McQuiston's first novel. I expected this going in (most authors don't exactly like writing the exact same book over and over), but people who go in expecting the same sort of novel as RWRB might be disappointed.

One Last Stop, as a whole, feels like a softer, sadder romance, while still having many aspects that made me love McQuiston's first book: a strong found family, a flawed, yet likable, main character, and a romance that both entirely grabs the reader's interest and serves as a way for both the main character and the love interest to grow. But again, even with these similarities, One Last Stop differs when it comes to the specifics. The humor in this book is more subtle, the found family is established within the story rather than before the story (as well as consisting of a much wider range of characters, in all aspects), the romance itself takes a much different path, and the MC, August, feels like the opposite of Alex in some aspects, she's a lot more protective of herself, a much 'rougher' character to those around her, though at her core, the same love of the world and people around her exists. These differences lead to a much different story, and while just as (if not more) enjoyable, it definitely requires the reader to be wanting something different than just a cute, funny rom-com.

One Last Stop, while reading, gave off vibes similar to The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue, in my opinion. It carried the same undercurrent of longing, of patient sadness, of coming to grips with how terrible the world can be and learning to find the beauty in small things, the good things that survive despite it all. It made the story overall feel slower than RWRB, and while I still loved reading it, it was less of a desperate rush to see what happened next and more of a slow unfurling of more story, more time and space for the characters to grow and learn to love again.

Overall, I genuinely really enjoyed this, and I loved seeing the range that McQuiston has, and all the potential for a rich variety of queer stories that we have yet to see from them. I highly recommend this, whether you enjoyed RWRB or not, and can't wait to see what they write next!

paulasnotsosecretdiary's review

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adventurous emotional hopeful lighthearted mysterious reflective medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

One Last Stop takes a daily occurrence - seeing the same stranger on the train each day - turning it into a love story to New York, finding community, and between two young women searching for love and a home. One Last Stop will engage readers and not let them go in the best way possible.

August sees Jane Su on the Q train on her way to Brooklyn College, where she has transferred, and her new apartment, where eccentric and supportive roommates embrace her. And then August sees Jane again. And sees her again. And again. An again. The two young women, drawn to each other, become friends over music, food, and fashion discussions. As their relationship blossoms, August discovers Jane can't remember who she is,  is more than she appears to be, and cannot leave the Q train. Using the skills she developed growing up as her mother searched obsessively for her missing uncle, August sets out to discover Jane's identity and how she became trapped in time on the Q train.

Like August, author Casey McQuiston moved to New York from the South, and if she used her life experiences in the story, she has done so with great success. The authenticity of experiencing a new city, finding one's way around, discovering community, balancing work, school, and making rent come through and enriches the story. 

What's especially enjoyable is how the love story develops. It's not rushed; Jane and August move from acquaintances to friends to lovers in a timeline that feel realistic and satisfying. As they get to know each other, Jane's nomadic existence and August's search for a home for herself complement each other. 

Although some readers may not expect or enjoy the science fiction/fantasy aspect of the story, there is so much to like. There is a community of LGBTQIA+ supporting characters who accept and celebrate August in her quest to help Jane, make a life for herself, and succeed in her job at a local diner. Romance readers will enjoy this thoughtful novel, and librarians will have another excellent suggestion to offer High School and adult patrons seeking stories celebrating LGBTQIA+ communities.

ashleysarra's review

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emotional hopeful relaxing slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0

2021 is the year of established up and coming authors making deep and reflective sophomore novels, and I'm so here for it. Casey Mcquiston wrote some time ago on her Instagram that she hoped people wouldn't compare One Last Stop to Red, White, and Royal Blue, and after reading the book I see why. One Last Stop belongs on a shelf all on its own. 

One Last Stop features a 23 year old August Landry, who moves to New York City after transferring to yet another university. Landry doesn't know what she wants for her life and has never had a close group of friends to fall onto when trouble arises. She has a missing uncle. She's easily overwhelmed by her new set of roommates. August also falls inexplicably in love with a random woman on the subway, and realizes this woman, an Asian-American lesbian named Jane, is stuck in time. 

While reading, I had been certain I knew how the story would progress. August grew closer to her roommates and learned more about Jane's life in the 70s, and she would have to learn how to let go of her feelings and say goodbye. I had resigned myself to a sad bisexual falls for a lesbian story, where the moral is grief and forgiveness. While there are plenty of times where August slowly learns how to let herself feel more and bury herself in distractions less, I was pleased to discover the ending is a happy one. August's conflicts with her mother, missing uncle, and romantic crisis with Jane all come together and resolve themselves nicely. Although there had been moments reading the first three quarters of the book where I believed the pacing to be too slow, the ending was so satisfying because it had truly felt like you had also spent months watching August and Jane fall in love and understand each other. This book has conflict, but the story is about so much more than drama and arguments. This is a story about family and meeting each other where they are. 

This is a gorgeous story, with moments of humor, hurt, and heart. This book feels alive, as if the characters themselves have earned their place among the living. Tenderness is a consistent feeling in the novel, demonstrated through budding romances and friendships. In a time where people nowadays still shy away from crowds, it's beautiful to have a story that is so intimate but takes place almost entirely in public spaces. In that way alone, readers will understand August's yearning, and will then become healed by moments where August and Jane can finally exist in private. 

Thank you NetGalley for a digital ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. One Last Stop comes out on June 1, 2021. Make sure to preorder the book or pick it up from your local bookstore.

Expand filter menu Content Warnings

jessiewolf's review

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emotional hopeful medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

taylordmccabe's review

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emotional funny hopeful mysterious relaxing slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

a perfect book. i sobbed like 10 times over how perfect it was.

acarter's review

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emotional funny hopeful lighthearted medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

5.0