Reviews

The Wise Man's Fear, by Patrick Rothfuss

hmsraindogs's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

I had almost given up on the novel as anything other than a passing form of entertainment to which I'd need to make very litte commitment of time (sometimes languishing on a book for many many months). My experiences with short stories and nonfiction had usurped the role prior held by novels in having an impact on me or driving me towards seeking out further reading.

That being said.

The prose of Patrick Rothfuss has been like a cup of coffee in the morning for me in a lot of ways. Allow me to explain: I'm not a morning person, not really, so I'm usually pretty groggy when I wake up. Usually, I tend to find some degree of ability to function, but it varies. On mornings when I find time to enjoy a cup of coffee or two (or seven or eight or twelve), I find myself much more invigorated than I really thought I could be. I can survive without coffee, but I'm much better off with it most mornings.

So, how are The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man's Fear like coffee? Well, much of my reading as of late has been less than fulfilling. It's been serviceable, and I've enjoyed many of the books I've read. But I was just going through the motions plugging away at a number of series. There was no real spark to my reading.

And then I discovered Patrick Rothfuss, and I was, like after drinking a cup of coffee in the morning, reinvigorated. His prose is a breeze packed with just the right amount of detail. His pacing jumps nimbly from the extremes of being breathtakingly brisk to almost agonizingly suspenseful to the point of bringing things to a near stand still as some grand plot element is revealed.

As a result, I was excited to read again.

For the first time in many years, I planned the rest of my day around making sure I had time to read. For the first time in many years, I found myself thinking about the story even when the book was at home, and I was out being "social." For many years, my reading had been predominantly of an academic nature (the curse of pursuing higher education) until I discovered Patrick Rothfuss.

His books have instilled in me again the wonder which accompanies reading. I want to banish my imagination to distant imaginary lands and let it roam like I haven't done since I first discovered The Chronicles of Narnia in elementary school.

For me, the real strength of these books is Rothfuss's ability to build this grand, convincing fantasy world which still seems grounded within its own rules and laws. He creates this giant world on a beautifully realized tapestry with enough details on which to weave his story, but he hints at an even bigger world. And this is where Rothfuss excels, he gives us a story and the tools and encourages to let our imagination play in his sandbox.

I'm not one for spoilers, so I won't go into that here. And I will admit that, for some readers, this book won't be perfect. But for me, this book and its predecessor were exactly what I needed to rekindle my love for reading and to rekindle my love for fantasy.

If the first two books are any indication, then I have no doubt the third one will also be a masterwork.

As far as I'm concerned, Mr. Rothfuss should take all the time he needs to write the book he wants. And I, as the reader, will be happy he did. I know it will be well worth the wait.

Thank you, Patrick Rothfuss, for making me the little kid first discovering the world of Narnia. You've shown me the way back there and the way to so many more worlds.

kokeshi8's review against another edition

Go to review page

3.0

Pensé que nunca lo iba a terminar.

robertwhelan's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

Very good. Annoying that book 3 is unreleased.

aliceallenaz's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

Love this series - this amazing world! So anxious for the third/final book!

emanning64's review against another edition

Go to review page

4.0

Having loved the first book, I was extremely excited to begin this one. Overall it is a good book though not as good as the first one. Despite being longer I still enjoyed it and had trouble putting it down at times.
However there were times that I felt some of it could have been cut out, with parts feeling like kvothe and Patrick rothfuss were just meandering about and not really doing anything.
Another thing is this is supposed to be a trilogy yet it doesn't seem that this book added a whole lot to the overall plot. It's going to take a lot to cover everything and tie all the ends up in the next book unless he wants to make it more than a trilogy.
Despite these gripes, I still enjoyed the book immensely. There were a lot of exciting moments that happened and it kept me entertained. Most importantly it has me hooked and wishing for the third book.

biddymesschaert's review against another edition

Go to review page

adventurous emotional funny hopeful mysterious slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Loveable characters? Yes

5.0

This series created a world I did not want to leave. Kvothe stole my heart and this is by far my favorite fantasy series. And I've read (and love) a few .

seeliefae's review against another edition

Go to review page

3.0

3,5 ⭐️
The second part was very disappointing. It made me cringe badly and I couldn't take kvothe seriously.

Patrick, you won't read this but please, PLEASE, don't ever write about sex ever again. You destroyed my boy. Stop writing women too, you write them like the old white man that you are.

readerxxx's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

I loved this book and now I have to suffer for three more years to wait for the conclusion. While I did not enjoy this one as much as the first in the series I still loved it. The journeys into Fae and with the red leathered warriors took a lot longer than they needed to.

ngreads's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

This book was just as epic as the first one, if not more so. Well written, well developed, and a very smooth continuation from the first book.
The only slight thing that I found unappealing about The Wise Man's Fear was how long the Felurian 'arc' was, but since I can completely understand the necessity of that part in the book and it was still very well written, I find that it doesn't really detract from how enjoyable the book is.
Where this book answered very few questions that were posed in the first book, I found that all of the stories presented in it and all of the arcs that it went through were very necessary to the final development of Kvothe's final character, and that all of the events in this book are necessary for understanding absolutely everything that will occur in the third book. It was that moment of chording in the middle of a symphony - not a lot of a crescendo, and not a lot of tie-in to the eventual finale and end of the melody, nor the most exciting or thrilling part of the song, but needed nonetheless to properly set up the audience for a stunning end.
This book is every bit as good as the first one promised, and with how The Wise Man's Fear was, I'm sure we can expect an absolutely incredible finale to the Kingkiller Chronicles.

rlse's review against another edition

Go to review page

5.0

Ok, it has stranger pacing than the first, but the storytelling is still totally engrossing.