Reviews

White Tears/Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color, by Ruby Hamad

pertiwi6's review against another edition

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5.0

‘The damsel in distress reveals that from the beginning of settler-colonial societies, race was gendered and gender was raced.’

It is hard to encapsulate the breadth of knowledge in this book. It is born of the very personal and yet seemingly universal experiences of women of colour whose attempts to address any manner of harm levelled at them are turned against them by white women claiming they are being treated unfairly. Hamad expertly breaks down this phenomenon and traces its history and insidiousness across the globe.

This is my history as a white woman as much as anyone else’s. I am firmly in colonialist camp - no less guilty because of the sexism endured but in so many ways utilising the struggle against misogyny to further exploit and marginalise BIPOC. History is so important because it does and is effecting our present! Learn and accept and work to change it!

hopejrc's review against another edition

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4.0

This was an excellent listen. There were many parts I wanted the physical copy to make notes. Great insight, enlightening history, overall superb examination. Obviously this is election week so I've been very distracted so it's possible I'll give this five stars on a reread.

mirandag908's review

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emotional informative medium-paced

5.0

eyre's review against another edition

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5.0

I'm a white woman and I think I needed to hear all that's been said in the book. In full disclosure, it wasn't an easy read for me - many times I found myself getting defensive, thinking words that I normally find obnoxious ("hey-not all women..."), but in the end, of course everything Ruby Hamad is saying is true.
Starting from a definition of whiteness (a very good one, I think), discussing racist tropes in today's culture and their origins, analysing the strategies white women use to undermine people of colour and going deep into the history to explain how and why power is used, the author provided us with a compelling and comprehensive set of essays that I'm personally very likely to go back to more than once in the future.

feminist_bookshelf's review against another edition

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informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

5.0

tsprengel's review against another edition

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informative slow-paced

3.5

velllichor's review

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will pick this up soon!!

e_flah's review

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challenging informative reflective
“Whiteness is and has always been fluid: to be white is less a state of biology and more a state of proximity to formal power, of access to an exclusive club.”

White Tears/Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color was an impactful and compellingly written book. The chapters cover a broader variety of topics than the title suggests -- there's the history of how negative stereotypes about women of color were constructed using whiteness and the patriarchy, a present-day look at the methods white women use to stifle women of color's voices, and an analysis of how colonialism props up the status quo. I found the organization of the content a bit confusing at times and would have loved if each chapter had a slightly narrower focus. That said, I learned a lot about the long history of white women using their power to discredit and harm women of color. There's a lot of great information in White Tears/Brown Scars and I would definitely recommend giving this a read.

“Strategic White Womanhood is a spectacle that permits the actual issue at hand to take a back seat to the emotions of the white woman, with the convenient effect that the status quo continues unabated.”

masriya's review against another edition

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informative reflective medium-paced

4.25

soupgod's review

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informative reflective slow-paced

4.0