Reviews

Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress by Christine Baldacchino

rachelkpf's review

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5.0

I don't usually write reviews, but I just have to share how awesome I think that this book is. Even though there's not much demand at my library, I've looked at book lists on gender-bending or nontraditional gender roles for kids. However, I've been generally underwhelmed by the many books that are on those lists because "she's a princess, but she's also smart." I just don't think that there is (or should be) anything particularly novel about that concept.

This book is about a boy who chooses to put on his favorite tangerine dress every day when he gets to school, because it makes him happy. Without being preachy, overly complex or theoretical, this book manages to communicate that Morris' gender expression is okay, and just one part of who he is. If the other children want to go on Morris' awesome pretend space adventures, they better accept the dress. Morris Micklewhite... avoids labels about sexuality and gender that most children probably aren't ready for. When little Becky tells Morris that "boys don't wear dresses," he says, "this boy does." And that's that.

I've had parents request superhero books for their sons and turn down Wonder Woman, and I've heard one friend tell another that he can't read Dork Diaries because "it's for girls." Morris Micklewhite... is so necessary, and such a breath of fresh air.

jaij7's review

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4.0

This would be phenomenal for the preschool and younger elementary set. A book about loving yourself and others because of your differences and tolerance.

courtneys_shelves's review

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4.0

I felt like this wrapped up a little too easily, but otherwise is a really good book, and could help kids empathize with kids like Morris who might dress or behave outside gender norms.

kristenremenar's review

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3.0

Pair this one with "Jacob's New Dress" by Sarah Hoffman. Morris is made fun of for liking to wear a tangerine dress (it's swishy) and high heels from the dress-up corner (they go clink, clink, clink when he walks). Nice for a one-on-one discussion or for a group discussion on what boys and girls are "supposed" to wear as opposed to wearing what one likes. Respectful and kind.

mehsi's review

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4.0

It is Banned Books Week again, and of course I have to participate and read some banned books!

This one just sounded perfectly cute, so I had to read it. Meet Morris, he is a normal boy, but he has something others may find strange, he likes to wear a tangerine dress and fit all the shoes there are in the dress-up center. And I can imagine that dress looks fabulous, and I agree it does remind me of a tiger.

But sadly, his classmates aren't so kind to him. They make fun of him for wearing the dress and the shoes. One even tries to rip the dress off him as, in her opinion, he cannot wear that dress.

I loved his mom, how supportive she was. That she loved her creative and imaginative boy for who he was. I have read a few other books were parents weren't so happy with their kids acting outside of the standard set ways (screw those btw).

I did feel terrible for Morris. He tried so hard to ignore it, but in the final day of the week... he just couldn't handle it, and I know the feeling. Bullying is terrible. Some people will say that words don't hurt, but sorry, they hurt. They freaking hurt a lot.

Morris also has a delightful imagination, and I loved that he wants to share it with people, even though they are mean to him. That is really brave and strong of him.

I did get a bit tired of the whole: The dress did this and that, the shoes did that and this. We get it, it swishes. We get it, shoes click.

And sure, the ending was a bit magical. One moment he feels crappy, then he feel better, gets magical confidence, and things are poof solved. I just wish it was that simple. But quite often, bullying doesn't just end because one gains confidence. I guess the author wanted the book to end on a happy note, and I am fine with that, but I would have rather seen it be less magical, and a bit more practical.

As for why the book was banned/or people wanted to get it banned. Heaven forbid a boy wears a dress. Come on people. *shakes her head*

The art was pretty nicely done. I did love the dress, and boy that colour was indeed fabulous.

All in all, I still would recommend this book. It was a good book to read.

Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/

cimorene1558's review

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4.0

I'm glad this book exists, really glad; we need books about boys who want to wear dresses and do, but I worry that this book makes it out to be a little easier for Morris than many boys would find it if they wore tangerine dresses to school.

topy_loving_books's review

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4.0

It's a nice sweet story. Loved the vibrant orange color of the dress and Morris' mom hair. But it felt like many other books talking about the same subject of a young boy who don't feat in the masculine mold. We do see boys but also girls bullying Morris, for his way of dressing, which is sad but realistic.

I especially appreciated the part where the boys push him away "threaten to get contaminate by his girlish ways", because it's often the case that boys/men, threaten in their own masculinity. They can act badly toward to person assigned boys/men at birth who are not scared to express every part of their gender identity.

sfujii's review

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4.0

A sweet story about Morris, who likes to adventure, play, and wear a tangerine dress. He gets a pretty tough time from his classmates, but he likes to wear it anyway. Love a good story about doing your own thing.

sidneyellwood's review

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4.0

That was quite cute! I liked that it wasn't all happy-go-lucky but everything turned out all right in the end. Also, I really love the art style of this book and the dress.

barbarianlibarian's review

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4.0

cute book. normalizes gender stereotypical activities by the opposite gender. totally normal sounding book, not preachy. great normal book to share with preschool-ish aged kids to give them a broader view on being openminded.