jasbutler's review

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challenging informative reflective fast-paced

4.0

midell26's review

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challenging informative reflective medium-paced

4.25

eschnitger's review

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informative medium-paced

4.25

nessynoname's review against another edition

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challenging informative slow-paced

3.5

This is not a long book, and yet, I don't know what it was, I just had such a hard time absorbing this book. Something to do with the diction being elevated higher than I was equipped to read (which is weird because the tone of the book is often "conversational" too,) or the structure of the points. I was *trying* let me tell you. I have been to college, I have read scholarly works of social science and history. I got to the point where I was both listening to this book on audio while looking at the book in print. It was... mesmerizing how opaque it was to me. 
I believe that this is a very important subject, and I do believe that the author has intelligent, salient things to say about it. I also really appreciated the author's consistent use of non-Western/non-First World examples when talking about colonial states endeavoring for independence and equity. But just something about the writing made it very hard to digest for me. I did absorb a handful of things from the work, and they are things that I think are very important to consider and mull over. But I just found that I was not able to take in everything the work had to say, and am left a bit bewildered about how much of it is my fault and how much of it is the author's fault. 

pranaysomayajula's review

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hopeful informative reflective fast-paced

4.0

cqs's review against another edition

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challenging informative fast-paced

ka_schulze's review against another edition

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challenging informative reflective fast-paced

3.5

rose_mac's review

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challenging informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

5.0

hanbanshee's review

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5.0

"Though we start from different levels of privilege or advantage, this journey is not a matter of figuring out who should bow to whom, but simply one of figuring out how best to join forces... we will need each other to get where we're going. And getting there, after all, is the point."

Táíwò’s clearly articulated and approachable text outlines the ways in which Empire and its class/political elites have learnt to weaponise the very tools that the oppressed have developed in struggle against it/them. This is not a case of lambasting "identity politics", but rather a careful analysis of how co-optation might be identified and resisted, through Táíwò’s conception of a "constructive politics" of solidarity that avoids "deference" when what is truly needed is to find ways to combine forces and enact systems-level change. The focus by liberals on “getting in the room” ignores the need to change the rules of the rigged game that excluded us from this room to begin with—Táíwò suggests enacting constructive refusal, choosing not to play any longer, and to use these opportunities to build a new world in the margins that this opens up.

bumblehui's review against another edition

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3.5

This could have been condensed into an easier to read essay. It brought up issues to think on but the two that stayed in my mind were that people going along with oppressive systems does not mean they agree. They just want to avoid what the consequence would be to not go along with the system. Cue the Emperor has no clothes story.

The second was that marginalized people are not always the best person to have the mic in the room. Trauma and marginalization does not equal great problem solver.