lfpbooks's review against another edition

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adventurous funny informative reflective medium-paced

3.5

laila4343's review against another edition

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3.0

The chapter on cranberries was by far the most interesting and well-written. Great idea, uneven execution.

lizella's review

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4.0

A must for food lovers that are interested in the history of American regional foods. Beahrs writes with true affection and passion for what regional foods are, how they developed, and how the changing tastes and industries of our growing nation have played a role in their availability or disappearance. This book is a coast-to-coast journey that tells the tale of America's people and their traditions through food.


I received this book through Goodreads First Reads.

sklepia's review

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informative reflective medium-paced

3.5

7anooch's review against another edition

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5.0

Really interesting way to write a biography.

frostbitsky's review against another edition

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funny informative reflective fast-paced

3.0

I enjoyed this. I found it really informative on the history of food (prairie chickens, raccoons and turtle soup!), and American history. Sometimes it did go off on long tangents about Mark Twain's life, but it was ok for me because I learned a lot about Twain that I didn't know before.

I liked how Audible adapted Andrew Beahrs book into a funny and informative documentary.

3 out of 5 Courses.

annettes's review

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adventurous emotional funny hopeful informative inspiring medium-paced

3.75

kayoft's review

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5.0

Perfect for any foodie who loves history, ecology, and learning more about Twain.

auntblh's review against another edition

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3.0

This one needs two ratings so I had to give it an average (and round up). I love the premise and some of the facts included in the story and would give that part a 4. However, I really didn't care for the writing style and would have to rate it a 1. I felt like a pinball...bouncing from this idea to that idea, back to this one, going completely off topic and then coming back. Did anyone (such as an editor) read this before it was published? For example, he goes from talking about earwigs in one paragraph to starting the next one with "Twain liked hot toddies". WHAT?! And this was in a chapter about oysters. The introduction and the epilogue were the most readable of all the chapters of the book. I so wanted to like this more and did enjoy some of the food facts. Some of the old "recipes" were entertaining and made me realize how they have changed over the years.

love_katie's review against another edition

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4.0

A combination of biography, history of American foods, and interviews in a podcast-style format, this is an incredibly enjoyable way to learn about Mark Twain and not only the foods he loved, but how they interacted with the culture around him. This is really far out of my comfort zone, but I'm so glad I decided to pick it up!