Reviews

Three Women, by Lisa Taddeo

vsttew's review against another edition

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3.0

No es, desde mi perspectiva el mejor libro, aunque sí toca uno de los temas que lamentablemente son más sonados y no de las formas que queremos “la mujer” y lo que la engloba.

annagroman's review against another edition

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2.0

I was excited to read this book as it came from the Book of the Month club, but I just found it to be an easy read. It didn't really make me think of much and at the end of the day I wouldn't tell anyone they had to read it. It was sold as a kind of sexual revelation, but I feel like it didn't dig enough into the character's lives to be such.

sophiegrace95's review against another edition

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emotional inspiring reflective medium-paced

5.0

roselogie's review against another edition

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challenging dark emotional hopeful reflective sad slow-paced

3.5

sarci_reads's review against another edition

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1.0

While I was reading this book I was hoping that the story would get better or there would be some form of enlightenment. Unfortunately, I was disappointed. This book felt like a transcript of three horrible women who pretty much fulfill every bad/degrading stereotypical image. And all of this without an expected turn in the protagonists' storyline nor did any self-reflection occur on the part of the three women.

wiebkepk's review against another edition

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emotional hopeful inspiring reflective sad medium-paced

5.0

safsafsaf's review against another edition

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reflective sad medium-paced

3.25

codyie's review against another edition

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medium-paced

4.25

gabie_east's review against another edition

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dark emotional reflective sad medium-paced

5.0

tackling_the_tbrs's review

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5.0

Taddeo explores female desire through the lives of three real women: Maggie, who forms a relationship with her teacher and later takes him to court; Lina, stuck in a loveless marriage and still pining for her high school sweetheart; and Sloane, whose husband likes to watch her have sex with other people.

It covers so many facets of love and desire in such an open, brilliant way. The prose is as fluid, painful and emotive as any fiction.

Narrative works are my favourite type of non-fiction purely because of the false sense of security they create. When bad things happen in fiction it’s awful to read, but you’ve at least got the safety blanket knowledge that none of it’s real. Taddeo writes so skilfully that I’d find myself reaching for this same comfort, and it’s a real sucker punch when you remember that the longing and sadness in this book is real – I just wanted to give Maggie the biggest hug.

These three women are sympathetic and intriguing and brave about their desires, and the sadness and joy these desires bring. Watching them work through these desires over the course of the book is rewarding, and though there was one character I felt ended in a similar place as she started, what else can we expect from real life?

My one small critique from an otherwise flawless book is that there’s little by way of diversity. I’d love to read a similar book that considers races and sexualities beyond cis white women.