Reviews

De naamgenoot, by Jhumpa Lahiri

maddieclair's review against another edition

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medium-paced

5.0

strangetimes87's review against another edition

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3.0

Moushumi and Ashima (and Ashoke, in his moments) make this book what it is. Otherwise, I really didn't enjoy the trite plotline of an Indian-American being confused about his identity.

nemastha's review against another edition

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dark funny informative relaxing medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.25

This book was pretty good (I liked the pace at the beginning). As a child of an immigrant, I could relate to ALOT, But I think after a while, the pace of the book was a bit iffy? It was also kind of generic in terms on plot (I've watched/read things similar to this, so it wasn't something ENTIRELY different). I really liked the ending tho, I liked that in a way < that gogol did not really have the typical happy ending, but more so in the sense that he was starting to embrace WHO he was, and started to FINALLY go on this journey of learning more about himself by starting to READ the books made by Gogol, thought that part was beautiful!> I also kinda liked the motif of the name and its development throughout the book. Gogol is what SAVES his father, however in that way, Gogol is also a means to be accepted within his family. However by going into school, into this predominately white community, Gogol no longer wants to be accepted by his family but by the people around him (this development of Gogol being something Gogol himself hates- this internalized hatred). The name of Nikhil is interesting, as it allows Gogol to leave through the lens of someone else, and in that way shows the sacrifice of identity to be accepted). 

I also thought the arc with  Moushumi also interesting- this idea that she escaped to the french language to escape the suffocation standards of English and Bengali. Her character was complex, as it was stock in someway... Her relationship with Gogol didn't last because of their different interests. 


vistacanas's review against another edition

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4.0

Even though not much happens in this book, I surprisingly liked it quite a bit. The characters are endearing and because I'm involved with current refugees, it gave me great insight into the kinds of dilemmas that they face when coming to a different country.

asquared92's review against another edition

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3.0

I found this book very thought provoking and intriguing. The author weaved an incredible story about what it meant and how it felt to be both a first generation American and an immigrant in a country and culture vastly different from the one in which they were raised. Jhumpa introduced compelling and moving characters who grappled with their identity for much of the book. I loved how the author portrayed each perspective so authentically and understandably. While my family is of Italian descent, I can imagine some of the feelings and reactions to America mirrored that of Gogol and his families. I connected with the characters and the story on a personal level because of that. Gogol’s journey to find himself and the way in which that journey and those emotions stirred him affected his relationships in an incredibly flawed and human way. The ending did feel a bit abrupt. I didn’t like how Gogol’s story felt unfinished.

shivi_m's review against another edition

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emotional reflective slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? It's complicated

3.75

emma_monicaa's review against another edition

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emotional medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0


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bookyenta's review against another edition

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One of my favorite books of all time.

rebeccabateman's review against another edition

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4.0

The Namesake is beautifully and quietly written. Ms. Lahiri weaves motifs such as independence, freedom, train rides, books and food as well as the running theme of the novel ("What's in a name?") with sophistication and subtlety.

Her characters are full of depth and life and, though their thoughtless choices left me frustrated, they are real. This book has a [b:Crossing to Safety|9820|Crossing to Safety|Wallace Stegner|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1166065576s/9820.jpg|1488871] vibe. It stays with you.

starcrunch's review against another edition

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4.0

I really liked this story. I read "Interpreter of Maladies" and I can barely remember any of those stories (although I enjoyed them). I feel like Gogol's story will stay with me longer.