Reviews for Naomi: Season One, by Brian Michael Bendis, David F. Walker, Jamal Campbell

amma_keep_reading's review against another edition

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3.0

Totally NOT what I was expecting but I'm intrigued enough to read the next installment.

abbyaroza's review against another edition

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4.0

3.5

Auntie gift giving: good for all ages, middle school?

megankb's review

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4.0

WOW. I have a lot of feelings about BMB's current real estate in DC comics. OK, mainly I just really, really hate that he aged Jon Kent up and also dude needs to stop covering art up with his lengthy and unnecessary diatribes. I'm actually, kind of, enjoying his Young Justice, though, and when Naomi showed up, I figured it was time for me to give her story a read. I'm really, really glad I did. This book starts out firing on all cylinders and, while it dries up a little near the end, I'm still super excited for more Naomi McDuffie. First off, this art is FREAKING STUNNING. I've been following Jamal Campbell on Far Sector so I know the man is good but Holy. Crap. This is just some of the most beautiful art I've ever seen. Naomi's character design is so dynamic and interesting, as well.

Now, for the story. Bendis and Walker take a deep look at the idea of the Superman mythos and how that would affect a kid (especially an adopted kid) growing up in the DC universe. And that's Naomi. A young, adopted girl, living in a painfully normal town, hoping that she is something more. I love this particular exchange between her and her therapist.



When Superman makes a brief appearance in town to fight an alien baddie, Naomi learns that something else weird happened right around the time she was adopted ... The story takes a few twists and turns and, as is usually the case, the real story is not quite as mind-blowingly amazing as it is built up to be. But. It's a very fun story and fits well in the Wonder Comics imprint. I think Bendis does best when creating his own new characters and less so when dealing with already well-established ones. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone looking for a new comic to check out.

grilledcheesesamurai's review

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3.0

Fun book! Reads great in single issues and I looked forward to it every single month. The world-building around Naomi and her origin story were interesting and the art was top notch.

Definitely looking forward to seeing what they do with this character in the future, this first volume is just the set up of who Naomi is and what she is (will be) all about, now that that is all taken care of I'm curious as to her place in the DC universe.

hypops's review

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4.0

Naomi is one of the strongest debuts of a new character in corporate superhero comics since Kamala Khan debuted as the new Ms. Marvel. Naomi is reminiscent of the early ‘90s Milestone Media characters of Dwayne McDuffie, et al. (is it a coincidence that the main character’s last name is also McDuffie?). Sure, it follows in many familiar superhero footsteps, but as an example of how to craft quality superhero comics, this is just about as good as it gets.

I was unfamiliar with artist Jamal Campbell’s work before this book, but after reading Naomi, I’m amazed that I haven’t encountered his work before. Among those working in the high-pressure, fast-turnaround environment of DC and Marvel, Campbell continues to turn out incredibly thoughtful layouts and sequences issue to issue. His work in issues 1 and 2 is some of the sharpest, most intricate art I’ve seen in corporate comics. He’s now firmly on my radar. Even if his careful attention to cinematic style falls away in the later issues/chapters, his work retains its “prestige” vibe throughout.

It would be easy to be cynical about this book. It prominently features a young woman of color and this first book is called “season one,” so, yeah, it’s cashing in on current market trends and aiming for what it clearly hopes will soon be a TV adaptation (for all I know, it may already be in the works). But cynicism aside, this is one of the most earnest, honest, and compelling character debuts in some time.

(Read in single issues)

borjabilbao's review

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3.0

Los tres o cuatro primeros números son chulos. El último par de vuelve un cómic de superhéroes estándar. Habrá que ver cómo sigue.

squidbag's review

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4.0

So, this was much better than I expected. It's just convoluted and steeped in DC history enough to satisfy long-term fans, but also fresh and lively in way that many things with a heavy backstory are not. The art is gorgeous, and the characters are well-developed. Bendis' dialogue is in low-gear, heavy-lifting mode here, only really returning to his early roots with the cut-off sentences and Naomi's BFF. Linked to a lot of DC's major events, but also somehow lifted above them, this would be an excellent first comic series for someone curious about the genre.

simplysumayo's review

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3.0

*3.5 This was not bad. The art is beautiful, there were a few times where the writing was hard to follow and didn’t make sense and while the whole super hero comes to America in a space ship and is then adopted is a bit cliche I still enjoyed it. I’m looking forward to seeing where the story goes and I hope it gets better from here!

yggdrasil's review

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adventurous lighthearted mysterious medium-paced
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters centre-stage? Yes

3.75

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