Reviews

After The Flood, by Kassandra Montag

caroledford's review against another edition

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4.0

3.5 stars

amielizabeth's review against another edition

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4.0

This is a very intense, gorgeous book. There is a lot of violence, and if I had young girls I don't think I could have made it through the book. I will definitely need something very light to read next.

thewrightsage's review against another edition

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2.0

I wanted to like this book, I really did. Really neat idea, cool world-building. But oh my gosh was this book completely predictable. Myra receives a quest at the beginning and does everything she can to meet up with her daughter. She makes it to where her daughter is at the end of the book, and what I believe was supposed to be a twist was unfortunately not-twisty at all. This book was boring, and every conflict was easily seen from miles away. I’d probably recommend it though, to someone who wants to enjoy a standard hero’s quest journey thing.

shelf_inspiration's review against another edition

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5.0

⛵️4.5 STARS⛵️

“Children think we make them, but we don’t. They exist somewhere else, before us, before time. They come into the world and make us. They make us by breaking us first.” - After The Flood.


SYNOPSIS: A little more than a century from now, our world has been utterly transformed. After years of slowly overtaking the continent, rising floodwaters have obliterated America’s great coastal cities and then its heartland, leaving nothing but an archipelago of mountaintop colonies surrounded by a deep expanse of open water.

Stubbornly independent Myra and her precious seven-year-old daughter, Pearl, fish from their small boat, the Bird, visiting dry land only to trade for supplies and information in the few remaining outposts of civilization. For seven years, Myra has grieved the loss of her oldest daughter, Row, who was stolen by her father after a monstrous deluge overtook their home in Nebraska. Then, in a violent confrontation with a stranger, Myra suddenly discovers that Row was last seen in a far-off encampment near the Arctic Circle. Throwing aside her usual caution, Myra and Pearl embark on a perilous voyage into the icy northern seas, hoping against hope that Row will still be there.

On their journey, Myra and Pearl join forces with a larger ship and Myra finds herself bonding with her fellow seekers who hope to build a safe haven together in this dangerous new world. But secrets, lust, and betrayals threaten their dream, and after their fortunes take a shocking- and bloody- turn, Myra can no longer ignore the question of whether saving Roe is worth endangering Pearl and her fellow travelers.” - After The Flood.

REVIEW: After finishing this book last night I took a moment to myself to take it all in. This book is not fast-paced and action packed, however it is an emotional journey. From when the book begins, to its end, it is all so very emotional and striking. At times (and at most times) it is depressing. All the worst things you think could happen because of the end of the world, do, and there are few light and fluffy parts. However, this makes the story seem so plausible, especially in these times of rapid climate change. The book left me thinking if this could really happen to the world someday in the future.

The book, overall, was beautiful. The writing was amazing and really complimented the slower pace of the book. I love the descriptions and imagery that Kassandra Montag made, which is what made it a page turner for me. In addition, I felt connected to the emotional journey of Myra throughout the book. Often dealing with tough decisions, impossible choices, guilt, and unwavering love. I rated this book a 4.5 because there are some relationships I’m the book that I wish were talked out/ fleshed out a bit more. But overall, this book was so great.

The characters in this book were also amazing. Each one complimented the story in some way, and added to the plot. Some of the secrets that the characters had ran so deep into their character and their own emotions that it added to the emotional quality of the book. There were SEVERAL times in this book where I teared up, cried, or felt an emotion so deep that I had to stop reading for a moment. This also was probably made worse because I read the book so quickly. I think this is a book to be read slow, and savored. Sometimes it got to be a little overwhelming, but it was still hard for me to put down.

This is a book that after you are done reading it, you will want to run to your nearest friend or family member and give them a hug. Even today as I am writing this review, the book and its various messages are still on my mind, and hard to shake. It is haunting, wonderful, and beautiful. I am looking forward to the next book that Kassandra Montag puts out, and will pick it up immediately.

“From the water we came and to the water we will return, our lungs always hungering for air, but our hearts beating like waves.” - After The Flood.

imagine77's review

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dark emotional hopeful inspiring sad tense slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? It's complicated
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.0

__apf__'s review against another edition

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3.0

After the Flood is a straightforward post-apocalyptic survival story: a mother loses one of her two daughters in a flood that swallows the world, and she spends the whole book trying to get her lost daughter back. Ships! Storms! Pirates! It was a fun read.

The book leans heavily on the emotional imagery of motherhood, evoking every parent's fear of losing their child. It brought to mind all of the ways I love and am afraid for my son. However, if you are not the parent of a young child -- or perhaps, if you are a parent who doesn't share these fears -- I could imagine this book falling flat for you. You are meant to imagine yourself as the mother, and live through her on the adventure; apart from that, she is a fairly one-dimensional character.

Despite being a book set in the future about a post-apocalyptic flood, this is not about climate change and it is not science fiction. Extremely little time is spent explaining why the flood happened; it simply did. As a result of the flood, humanity is technologically transported back to the 1700s. If this were a movie, the set would look like Pirates of the Caribbean but with jeans. (These aren't flaws of the book, it simply took me by surprise.)

trike's review against another edition

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2.0

This is [b:The Road|6288|The Road|Cormac McCarthy|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1439197219l/6288._SY75_.jpg|3355573] meets Waterworld, not exactly a tasty combination. You can make anything work if you sell it right, but I simply didn’t buy into the premise, which is that the world has flooded so completely that only mountaintops are above the sea.

First of all, if the worst-case scenario of global warming happens and all the ice on the planet melts and the water increases due to thermal expansion, then the oceans will rise about 200 feet. That’s enough to drown the coasts and completely submerge places like Florida and most of Nicaragua, and we’d lose cities like Sydney and Venice, but more than half of the land would still be there. (I just googled it and it’s 216 feet.) Here’s an interactive map: https://cartoscience.users.earthengine.app/view/sea-level-rise (Here in the middle of New Hampshire I’ll be walking distance from the shore. But still dry.)

So there’s that. But here’s another thing to consider: with less land, hurricanes and typhoons increase in power. One of the reasons there are so many dinosaur fossils is because the ancient continents of Pangea and, later, Laurasia + Gondwana meant that the Earth had a gigantic ocean, which fueled superstorms called hypercanes. Those then flooded low-lying areas, wiping out animals by the hundreds of thousands in a single storm. So not only will land disappear, the weather will get worse. Vicious, ferocious storms will be the norm, and they will be everywhere.

That’s not really a survivable scenario if you eliminate 99% of land as Montag has done. Also, where is everyone getting their bread in this book? Few people I know are aware of where their food comes from, nevermind what goes into producing it. With modern farming we can get about 2,500 loaves of bread from one acre of wheat. But that’s under ideal conditions. The soil on mountaintops next to the ocean is not ideal, to say the least.

Then there’s the sailing. The time and distance are all over the place. In the early parts of the book it seems to only take them a few days to travel thousands of miles, while later on it becomes more realistic and it takes them weeks. And then they encounter icebergs. Which means the water didn’t come from global warming. So I don’t know where it’s from, then. How is that no boats survived the flood? No yachts, no naval ships? I mean, an aircraft carrier has more than 6,000 sailors aboard. The US currently has 11 carriers. With their attending fleets that’s over 80,000 sailors. Where are those guys?

These things kept bothering me throughout the story.

The characters weren’t a joy to be around, but given the setup that’s understandable. Instead of a father/son team like in The Road we have a mother/daughter one, which is cool, but it did strain credulity later on facing off against pirates.
SpoilerIt’s just hard to buy that a woman could so easily overpower a man and slit his throat, especially after she had been on short rations for weeks and he was well-fed and fully functional with, presumably, years of battle under his belt. Women can be absolute badasses, but most men are simply bigger and stronger than most women. Yet she dispatched numerous bad guys easily. I would have bought into it if she had used cunning, guile and quickness, but she just straight up overpowers men. Yeah, no.
And the fact no navies survived to deal with pirates when it’s only been about 10 years since the world-ending flood.... Hard to buy into.

All in all it feels like a poorly thought out world, which was constantly bugging me.

graceve's review against another edition

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adventurous challenging dark emotional reflective sad tense fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Character
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

5.0

jenlisy's review against another edition

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4.0

A new take on our dystopian future. It's like WaterWorld with a strong female character!

kmogavero's review against another edition

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3.0

I loved the water metaphors and ocean imagery throughout the book but a few of the plot developments fell a little flat for me.