Reviews

Henrietta Who?, by Catherine Aird

annabelpitt's review against another edition

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lighthearted mysterious slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? Plot
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? No

4.0


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kwil's review against another edition

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3.0

This is a quickly read mystery, perhaps due to the hefty amount of dialogue moving the plot forward. Much of the novel is, in fact, dialogue between characters. There is little character development and any scenery is only succinctly noted. Yet this light little mystery packs a punch in the plot department. Motive can be guessed fairly early in the story; the who and the how are what pull the reader to the end. This reissue of the second book in the Detective Inspector C.D. Sloan series, which began in the late 1960s, is refreshingly free of modern day trappings. Nothing but good ol’ fashioned detective work on these pages. Overall, this fun whodunit is perfect for a lazy afternoon’s entertainment.

fern17's review against another edition

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adventurous lighthearted medium-paced
  • Strong character development? No
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? No
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.0

pgchuis's review against another edition

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4.0

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley.

Grace Jenkins' body is discovered lying in a quiet village road by the postman and the post-mortem reveals both that she has been run down deliberately and that she has never had a child. Her daughter, Henrietta, who is away at college, is therefore left not knowing who she is. Grace has always told Henrietta about her father, whose photo sits on the mantelpiece and who supposedly died fighting in WWII, but the police determine that this too is a fiction.

I gathered that this mystery was set in the early 60s, when phone calls were always made from call boxes and (surprisingly) everyone was available for questioning over the weekend - gentler times! I enjoyed this story very much and read it in one sitting. The detective running the investigation, Inspector Sloan, was humorous and gently contemptuous of both his constable, Crosby, and his superintendent, Leeyes, (in true Morse fashion). The story is largely dialogue and plot-driven, with little in the way of musings on the nature of evil or lengthy back-stories explaining why certain characters were in some way "damaged". The plot was logical and clearly laid out and Henrietta's despair at ever finding out her true identity seemed all too understandable at times. The rector and his wife were lovely supporting characters and I was glad that Bill stood by Henrietta.

Slight niggles: why did Henrietta's birth family never try to find out what had become of her? I did not really buy into the suggestion that her parents might have been murdered.

lnatal's review against another edition

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3.0

Early one morning in the quiet English village of Larking, the body of a woman named Mrs. Jenkins is found in the road. Miles away, her daughter, Henrietta, receives the bad news while working in the university library.

3* The Religious Body (Inspector Sloan #1)
3* Henrietta Who? (Inspector Sloan #2)
TR The Stately Home Murder (Inspector Sloan #3)
TR A Most Contagious Game

nichola's review against another edition

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4.0

This was fun! Definitely better than the first one! And once you get into her style of writing the characters really do come to life.

raehink's review against another edition

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3.0

Inspector Sloan investigates multiple murders which are gradually depriving a young woman of her inheritance. The book has a rural setting with a modest love interest.

julieputty's review against another edition

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3.0

Pretty enjoyable but emotionally flat.
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