blissfulbookworm's review against another edition

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3.0

The tale of these two Korean twins, separated at birth and adopted out internationally to totally different families (one French, one American) is a compelling story. The book itself, however, is not as compelling, although I can't fault it too much since I think its innately difficult to write a compelling memoir when you're all but 25 years old... In short, the book isn't particularly deep or reflective--and whenever something a little more serious comes up, it's not given as thorough a treatment as it really deserved. The twins have also produced a documentary, Twinsters, about their remarkable story, and I wonder if it is a stronger work than this book--but overall, I still enjoyed reading about this incredible reunion between two sisters.

arsenic's review against another edition

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3.0

Après avoir vu le documentaire Twinsters sur Netflix, j'ai voulu en savoir plus sur ces deux soeurs retrouvées : avaient-elle gardé contact après tous ces évènements, étaient-elles proches, etc. En farfouillant l'internet, j'ai appris qu'elles avaient écrit un livre sur leur histoire.

Le livre est un bon complément au documentaire, certaines parties sont plus développées dans le livre, on a plus le point de vue d'Anaïs alors que j'avais trouvé le documentaire très centré sur Sam.
Le livre se lit facilement, il est parfois redondant mais ça ne m'a pas gênée.
On découvre aussi comment le documentaire s'est fait et les sentiments des uns et des autres dessus, ce que j'ai trouvé intéressant.

C'est une histoire qui fait chaud au coeur, j'aime beaucoup les histoires de frères et soeurs qui se finissent bien et celle-là est très touchante. Je suis vraiment ravie que cela se soit si bien passé (globalement) pour elles. :)

blue_squishie's review against another edition

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informative inspiring reflective medium-paced

4.0

author_d_r_oestreicher's review

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4.0

On November 19, 1987 twin girls were born in South Korea. They had no idea they were twins until Christmas 2012. This fantastic story is told in Separated @ Birth by Bordier and Futerman with help from Lisa Pulitzer, writer of memoirs and biographies. The story of these two young women is an introduction to the 21st century for those of us who were born before the 1980s.

If you're interested in how fun it can be to be young and affluent in the 21st century, read this.

For more see: http://1book42day.blogspot.com/2015/04/separatedbirth-by-bordier-futerman.html

blessedbookworm's review

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4.0

Glad I finally finished this book.

Anais and Sam are twins that were separated at birth and adopted no one was told they girls had a twin. A friend of Anaïs found a video on YouTube that Sam did about her experience being adopted and realized how much the two looked alike. Told in alternating chapters by each of them, this book is their story about how they found about each other and reuniting months later. I like how they shared all their thoughts and feelings about the whole experience, from first teaching or to one another and being extremely nervous if it was the right thing to do, to reuniting and beyond.

I like how each of their parents wrote in the epilogue their take on everything and how it affected them. I cannot I'll imagine being 25 and finding out I have a twin that I never knew existed. I'm interested to look up thre documentary they did, Twinsters, and watch it.

allie_love's review

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3.0

I enjoyed the documentary on Netflix so it was nice to get a bit more detail, especially to hear a bit more of Anais's side. Parts of the book felt repetitive and the accents with the audiobook sometimes got distracting but still a wonderful story. I am so glad they managed to find one another in this crazy world!

candacepinney's review

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4.0

This was a really good read. I don't usually read non fiction, but this was so intriguing to me. Some parts of this did kind of drag on (because you're getting the same story from 2 people, 2 perspectives of the same events), but I thought it was good. The whole story made me see the adoption process in a different light. I think my favorite thing about this book was a little about the culture in Korea and how so many children there are adopted out of the country. I don't want to reveal any spoilers or anything, so I feel I can't say more than that. I really look forward to seeing the documentary later this year.

lisahelene's review

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4.0

I saw the documentary about this and was glad there was a book. I like to get more of the story and behind the scene stuff.
I liked how they switched off the pov, I really felt like I could understand both girls better that way.
I hope they can learn their birth mom's story. As Anais said, everyone has a theory. I know I do!

katymvt's review against another edition

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2.0

Pop Sugar 2018 Reading Challenge-A book by two authors

This was repetitive, redundant, and it repeated itself a lot.

There were some interesting parts, but it drove me crazy. Everything was incredible, amazing, or crazy. Now, I'm sure it was. But, you don't have to tell me so every other sentence. There was too much detail about the mundane. Did anyone really care about the furniture and architectural style of the various settings? I certainly didn't.

They also seemed to contradict each other in places. Sam says Anais had a panic attack and she held her in the bathroom. Anais said Ryan found her and brought her to Sam. Also, Sam said they didn't purposely set out to trick their grandmother, but Anais basically said they did. Just for instance. There are other places, also.

I hate to judge people that I don't know, and I promise, on the off chance that I meet either of them, I'll give them a blank slate. But, my goodness, Sam is super annoying. And, with the amount of times she said that she was more concerned about Anais' feelings than about the documentary, I have to wonder if she's trying to convince us, herself, or Anais?

Also, these people are 25/26 years old. Maybe after the first couple of times, we can stop trying to trick people? I honestly can see them wanting to know if their closest friends and family can tell them apart. I would be interested to know that, too, if I just discovered a long-lost twin. But, enough is enough.

I think the best parts of the book are the first couple of chapters when they just find out, the last chapter with info on the twin study, and the epilogue where each of the parents and girls write a few paragraphs about their feelings. This would have made a better magazine article.

So, my last thought on this book is that it reminded me of this exercise we did in my composition class in college. We had to write for ten continuous minutes. The only rule was that we could not stop writing. And I feel like that was what this book was. That's a great idea, as long as you edit later. This mostly just felt like rambling to take up space. Probably my review seems that way also.

definingmyworld's review against another edition

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5.0

Imagine one day opening Facebook and reading a message from a stranger that says, "I think we might be twins... don't freak out..."

I was introduced to the women in this book Samantha and Anaïs through their Kickstarter Page 'TWINSTERS' that had gone viral last year. I was fascinated by their story: two sisters, one an American actress living in California and the other a french fashion design student living in London found each other through social media. By the time I got around to their kickstarter page, their campaign had ended and since I didn't want to wait around for the documentary, I found their book online. I don't usually read memoirs but I found this book really interesting. Not just because the plot sounds like it could be a Lifetime movie event but because I was basically given the ending (the sisters finding each other) and having to work backwards to fill in their journey.

The book narration switches between the two sisters Samantha and Anaïs, throughout the book. By the fourth chapter I knew who was writing the section even without the heading because each sister had such an individual voice and style of writing. The story spans over several months and spans over three continents in their journey of discovering not just each other but each other's families, friends and life. Having watched their Kickstarter trailer and a couple of their interviews on YouTube, I can see their personality in the way they write. Sam is a very 'take charge' kinda girl (she was also the one that initiated their trip to South Korea) while Anaïs presence just oozes French. The 19 chapters + epilogue covers their journey, from their initial contact on Facebook to exchanging adoption papers and photos, meeting each other in person, travelling thousands of miles to South Korea and spending holidays together. There's a lot of love, laughs and joy that's contained in this book. I never once felt that they were angry or sad about their circumstances but rather grateful and joyful that they were able to find each other through the power of social media which is something that may not have not have been possible 10 years ago.

This book also covers their feelings about 1) being adopted and 2) being Asian and adopted by white families in two different continents. They talked in depth about the prejudices they individually encounters even to this day. There was even a section where Anaïs talks about how if one of her neighbor sees her on the street and doesn't know her family they may think that she's the maid not the daughter.

I had a hard time placing this book my reading challenge list between a memoir or a book that made me cry. Books rarely make me cry and I am not a big fan of the memoir genre but since I made the commitment to read one book per challenge, I will mark this book down as a book that made me cry. I may have had a couple of sniffles throughout the book but I made it through 19 chapters without a single tear.Then I hit the epilogue where the sisters had their sets of parents write their experiences and Anaïs' dad got me, "When I held Sam in my arms to greet her, my heart fainted and all my rational prejudices faded away instantly. I did not need a DNA test anymore to know that the extraordinary had happened." Merci for the tears Monsieur Jacque Bordier.