Reviews

Everything That Burns by Gita Trelease

firebreathingbqueen's review against another edition

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adventurous hopeful fast-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Loveable characters? Yes

3.5

The duology has a really nice setting and it was interesting to see the what if of magicians during the revolution. The magic system is different to many others, which is interesting, but I would have liked it to be explained a bit more. Overall a solid book 

ironsandwine's review against another edition

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adventurous emotional tense slow-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

3.5

njlb's review against another edition

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2.0

didn’t realise it was a sequel. overall not a fan but enjoyed the atmosphere of france and the lost girls. ending was fairly compelling with the plot twist but the rest didn’t really grip me

lyramadeline's review

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4.0

This was great! I didn’t enjoy it as much as the first book, but it was still fun. I don’t know if this series will have more books, but I would definitely read them if there were.

sqiddo13's review against another edition

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adventurous dark emotional hopeful mysterious medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? It's complicated
  • Loveable characters? Yes

4.0

elenikin's review against another edition

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adventurous lighthearted medium-paced
  • Plot- or character-driven? A mix
  • Strong character development? Yes
  • Loveable characters? Yes
  • Diverse cast of characters? Yes
  • Flaws of characters a main focus? Yes

4.25

Cute follow up to the 1st book. Loved the magic and the time period. 

molliewallace337's review

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4.0

I enjoyed the sequel more than the original!

jademelody's review

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3.0

Please believe me when I say that I wanted to enjoy this. I wanted to enjoy this book after enjoying my reread of the first book. Neither of those really happened. The first book was fine, but any magic (haha get it because the book deals with magic) that I found within the first book, the first time around, completely disappeared once I picked it up the second time. I mostly figure this to be because I am not the biggest fan of rereads, but also because I have changed a lot this reading the first book two years ago. Had this come out under its original title and it's original publication date (May 2020) then maybe this would've been more of a success with me. But here in 2021 it kinda flopped.

It wasn't a complete flop... just enough for me to know, or predict, the twists before they happened and that I was bored by the writing the whole time. What was such a hit the first time I read the first book, kept on and on and on, with no luck of capturing my attention fully. The characters were better in this one. They were fleshed out and had more personalities than in the first book, which I did appreciate. Instead of the focus being solely on Camille, like in the first book, I like how this one focused more on the other characters too.

This book did have good elements, and if you have read the first book recently and enjoyed it, then this one will most likely be a success for you! I'm sad that it wasn't for me.. but that just happens sometimes.

captain_valour's review against another edition

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adventurous hopeful slow-paced

4.0

brooke_review's review against another edition

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4.0

History and fantasy magically combine in Gita Trelease’s Enchantée series! This magical realism take on the French Revolution is the perfect duology for lovers of both historical fiction and fantasy for its richly imagined rewriting of France’s past featuring a plucky heroine.

The Enchantée series opens with the novel All That Glitters (formerly titled Enchantée in some versions), and tells the story of how poverty-stricken orphan Camille Durbonne uses her secret magical powers to transform herself into an elegant lady of the French court and provide for herself and her sister by winning at the card tables at Versailles. Now in Everything That Burns, Camille is living a life of comfort, but Paris is up in arms amidst the French Revolution. Camille does what she can to help the Revolution by creating pamphlets that tell the true stories of some of the marginalized girls of Paris, but when her pamphlets become a roaring success, she can’t help but wonder if magic is playing a part in her life once again. When King Louis XVI makes a proclamation outlawing magic, Camille worries that time is running out, not only for herself, but for those she loves.

All That Glitters and Everything That Burns are a perfect literary yin and yang. While All That Glitters is heavy on the magic and light on the history, Everything That Burns is just the opposite, delving deeper into the French Revolution with just sprinkles of magic here and there. These books complement each other well, and each provide a different reading experience, yet are both focused on the same characters and setting.

I personally picked up Everything That Burns because I loved the world that Trelease created in All That Glitters and I wanted more of it. Unfortunately, I was a bit disappointed on that front because as previously stated, magic takes a backseat to history in this sequel. Despite this, however, Everything That Burns is still an interesting, well-written novel that can be enjoyed by both teens and adults. Trelease vividly captures the chaotic atmosphere of Paris and translates it to the page in a way that is accessible to readers. She writes a strong and determined heroine in that of Camille, and presents her in such a way that readers can both relate and aspire to.

On the other hand, the plot of Everything That Burns does slow down at points and becomes less than interesting. I did find my attention waning in parts of the novel. Add in the multiple subplots, and the main storyline becomes difficult to follow because readers don’t know where they should be looking. As readers will likely be picking up Everything That Burns after reading All That Glitters, this can prove to be a problem if they aren’t prepared for the heavier, denser plot and tone that this sequel provides.